Train Horses for a Living and Wondering Approximate Amount of Down Time Before Resuming Work?

5'3. 120 lbs. very fit and muscular. Looking to go from small B to C cup

Doctor Answers (8)

Resuming activity after BA

+1

After breast surgery, you should be able to resume heavy physical activity in about three weeks.  Gradually ease back in to activities, but if you handle horses, figure on about three weeks.  Good luck!


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Getting back to strenuous work after surgery

+1

I generally have patients wait 4 weeks prior to doing any heavy lifting. However, I have had patients, including body builders, who went back to the gym within a week and had no problems (they didn't follow my recommendations). Generally your doctor will recommend what is the safest thing to do. If you choose to go back to work sooner, you just need to realize that there is a higher risk that you can have a complication such as a hematoma. Best of luck.

Paul Wigoda, MD
Fort Lauderdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Train Horses for a Living and Wondering Approximate Amount of Down Time Before Resuming Work?

+1

Six weeks is the standard recommendation for returning to strenuous activity. That is base upon the healing strength of the incisions, which approach 90% of their maximum by six weeks. Women that do office work are back in a few days

All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

You might also like...

Work

+1

I allow my patients to gradually start to resume normal activities at three weeks after surgery. The progression is very patient dependant

Norman Bakshandeh, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Down time after surgery

+1

It is highly recommended to wait at least six weeks in order for your body to heal completely since training horses is such an strenuous activity.

Eduardo Gongora, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Training Horses after Breast Augmentation

+1

       Any strenuous activity I would restrict for 4 to 6 weeks, but every plastic surgeon will have a different opinion on this.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

Returning to work after a breast augmentation

+1

My general protocol for resuming activities is that breast augmentation patients can resume general activities as soon as they feel up to it, more strenuous activities after three weeks.  Even after three weeks, if your implants are placed under the chest muscle, you may still have tightness across your chest.  It may take two to three months for the chest muscle to fully soften and relax following a sub-muscular breast augmentation.  If the implants are placed above the chest muscle, you might see your final results in two or three WEEKS.  It takes longer for the final result when the implants are placed under the muscle but I think it is worth the extra time in the long run. 

Edwin C. Pound, III, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Downtime after Breast Augmentation

+1

Hi Bourbon. It is my recommendation to pateints to be out of work for one week after surgery. You are up and about right away. For strenous activity I would be careful for a total of a month. Training horses sounds kind of strenuous to me! My concern would be if the horse made an unexpected movement and it pulled on you or you were struck in the chest this could damage things. The strength of healing in the human body is dependent on time and it usually takes 42 days till thing are close to normal. That is not to say you cannot do anything for this time frame (everyday the wounds are stronger) but it is something to be aware of.

Hope this helps!

Scott R. Brundage, M.D.
Grand Rapids Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.