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Traditional CO2 Laser After Profractional XC

Would doing traditional CO2 laser (NOT CO2 fraxel or Fractional, but traditional CO2 laser)help remove the tiny holes/pixels and lines left from a Profractioal XC procedure? Additionally, I feel the Profractional XC procedure changed the texture of my skin and I'm wondering if having a "Traditional" CO2 laser will help restore that as well.

Doctor Answers (2)

Fractional CO2 laser and post treatment redness

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Patients should expect some residual and transient redness after fractional co2 laser.  I would recommend the pulsed dye laser and ipl treatments, used judiciously, after the fractional co2 laser in order to minimize the redness after laser skin resurfacing. 

Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Fully ablative CO2 after fractional CO2

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Hello. To address the question, the tiny dots from the fractional co2 should go away with time. I have yet to see a patient where the tiny dots had become permanent. With respect to the lines, are you talking about red lines, pigmented lines? When you are talking about the texture being changed after the fractional, are you saying it got worse? Typically, the texture gets smoother and better. With respect to lines, if there are red lines, this can be normal and will resolve with time. If there are pigmented lines, then you need to go on bleaching creams. If you want to do the fully ablative CO2 to correct some of the potential side effects caused by Fractional CO2, I would first have your physician evaluate you. Also, I would not generally recommend it especially if it sounds like you had some unpleasant side effects from the fractional. Remember, the fractional treats only a fraction of the skin that the fully ablative co2 does. SO if you did not like the results of the fractional, you might not like the results of the fully ablative laser either. Dr. Behnam

Santa Monica Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

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