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Touching Nose After Cast Removal? Is that Safe?

I had a rhinoplasty over a week a go to straighten out my nose (deviation) elongate with ear graft and refine the tip area. After the cast came off I touched it and felt along the sides off and on for a couple days straight. I didn't know that I couldn't touch my nose because my doctor told me to clean often with an astringent to avoid breakouts. I'm so paranoid now to touch it! When I wear makeup I usually rub it in to smooth it out and get it even. Is that okay? I'm so confussed and worried.

Doctor Answers (10)

Post OP Rhinoplasty

+1

Relax, gentle touching of your nose should have no effect on the result. Short of bumping your nose or pushing hard enough to move something  (significant pressure) you will not harm your rhinoplasty


Miami Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Touching Nose After Cast Removal After Rhinoplasty

+1

Hi Sherry,

Don't worry, gently  touching your nose shortly after your rhinoplasty should not adversely affect your results.  Discuss your concerns with your rhinoplasty surgeon.  I hope that you love your new nose.  Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Touching a Nose after Cast Removal

+1

Other than gently touching the nose to clean the skin I do not want my patients to touch their noses for the first 3 weeks after the cast is removed following rhinoplasty. Having said taat , follow your surgeon's instructions.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Touching nose after a rhinoplasty

+1

It is safe to touch your nose after the splint is removed. Of course, this doesn't necessarily include forceful activities.You need to specifically discuss with your surgeon what and what should not be done with regard to your nose such as cleaning, etc. 

Steven Turkeltaub, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Care after a rhinoplasty

+1

its important to follow your doctors instructions.  come patients require massage and some taping and some no touch..  listen to your surgeon

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Post-rhinoplasty

+1

You certainly can touch your nose after the splint is removed, I just wouldn't be pushing too hard on it for a a few wweks, because it may disturb some of the work and healing process.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Touching nose after rhinoplasty

+1

I doubt that you have harmed anything.  You would have to exert a good amount of force to move things around.  This would also be quite uncomfortable.  Donald R. Nunn MD  Atlanta Plastic Surgeon.

Donald Nunn, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Touching Nose After Cast Removal? Is that Safe?

+1

You should follow the instructions of your Rhinoplasty Surgeon however, I advise my Rhinoplasty patients not to touch their noses and feel around for the first month post op.  After 1 month, I instruct all my Rhinoplasty patients on manual lymphatic drainage of the nose.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Cast

+1

Yes, it is safe   to touch your nose afteer cast removal. In fact, I often have patients massage out small ares of swelling. Just be gentle

David A. Bray, Sr., MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

You can touch your nose after surgery.

+1

You can touch your nose after the cast is removed.  How aggressive you touch it, and massage it is really dependent on what was done and the comfort level of your surgeon.  Speak with  your surgeon to get the best most individualized answer. 

Philip Miller, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.