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I was hit in the left side of my face with a baseball last year. Could I have a deviated septum? (Photo)

The hit caused my eyes to water badly and my nose to bleed/bruise. I did not get it looked at by a doctor. Recently I have been feeling pressure on and around the hump and bridge, as well as discomfort near the nostrils (especially when i exercise). It feels like I need to knock my nose into place and is causing headaches. The bulb of my nose now bends to the left while the upper nasal bones seem to have shifted to the right (c-shape?). I can breathe through left nostril much better than right.

Doctor Answers (7)

Deviated septum and crooked nose

+2
It does appear that you have a deviated septum and it could be from your trauma.  If you are having breathing problems you would benefit from a septoplasty.  The key to a straight nose is a straight septum.  


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

I was hit in the left side of my face with a baseball last year. Could I have a deviated septum?

+2
   Your nose can probably benefit from a septorhinoplasty to improve the appearance and the function, but an exam will be necessary to make that determination.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 238 reviews

I was hit in the left side of my face with a baseball last year. Could I have a deviated septum?

+2
It is very likely you would benefit from a Septoplasty / Rhinoplasty.  The septoplasty will address the functional issue, deviated septum, and breathing.  The Rhinoplasty will address the cosmetic issue, so that you can get a feminine nose on your pretty face.  Consult with a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who is highly trained in Nasal surgery for your best result.  Best wishes!

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

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Traumatic deviated septum

+1
Dear KN92,

It appears from your pictures and from your clinical history as though the traumatic accident may have resulted in a nasal bone and septal fracture. The fracture of the partition of your nose may be currently causing some degree of nasal airflow obstruction. From a cosmetic perspective, there may be some external topographic aspects of your nasal-facial balance that you may find sub-optimal. Analysis of your photos reveals very nice cranio-facial features, eyebrows, eye bones, cheek structure and chin. If you find that your nose somewhat dominate your nasal-facial balance proportion, both live and in photos, you may seek the expertise of a plastic and facial plastic surgeon who has significant rhinoplasty experience and explore the options for a reduction rhinoplasty.

Clearly the functional goal of improved breathing is paramount. Ensure that your rhinoplasty specialist has both ear-nose-throat and head-neck surgery training, specifically for airway management as well as cosmetic reduction rhinoplasty experience. The breathing obstruction itself may in fact be covered by Ontario Health Insurance Plan and be a managed care component of your procedure and you may elect just to have the breathing correction performed. Most cosmetic plastic surgeons perform a cosmetic rhinoplasty component and the reduction rhinoplasty component, both length reduction, width reduction and deprojection of the tip, would be something that is not covered by the managed care plan in Ontario.

The most important aspect of your care will be to ensure that you select a well-trained rhinoplasty surgeon with many years of experience in both airway surgery and cosmetic rhinoplasty procedures. I have been performing cosmetic septal rhinoplasty procedures for almost 29 years and was fortunate to have both ENT otolaryngology and head-neck surgery training, facial trauma training, as well as a 17-year history of cosmetic facial plastic surgery expertise. It is very important in my practice, when meeting with rhinoplasty patients, to do pre-operative 3-D and 2-D nasal imaging to show you the type of nasal-facial balance proportion changes that will likely occur.

A very-well trained plastic and facial plastic surgeon will be able to predict very accurately the kind of range of improvements that you can expect. The correction of your airway will generally be dependent upon the kind of septal deviation and trauma, if any, that has occurred and other airway factors that are unique to your anatomy.
Take the time to select a rhinoplasty and certified plastic surgeon that works for you; in fact, it is a good idea to interview two or three before deciding.

To find out more about septal rhinoplasty surgery, please check the link below.

I hope this helps, best of luck.

Sincerely,
R. Stephen Mulholland, M.D., Certified Plastic Surgeon and Rhinoplasty Surgeon, Yorkville, Toronto

R. Stephen Mulholland, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Deviated septum

+1
It is very possible that you have a deviated septum along with broken ansal bones and twisting of the nasal cartilage. A facial plastic surgeon should be able to diagnose this for you and offer a good treatment plan, this should also improve your breathing as well as the appearance of your nose.

Vartan Mardirossian, MD
Jupiter Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Do I Have a Crooked Septum?

+1
Thank for the pictures but I cannot tll if you have a deviated septum. An examination would be necessary. the 2 nasal bones could be in an asymmetrical position without septal deviation. Your breathing history does suggest that you do have some nasal obstruction.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Septoplasty and rhinoplasty procedure candidate

+1
A septoplasty is performed on the internal portion of the nose when there is obstructing bone and cartilage blocking air flow. A deviated septum can only be determined by examination of the internal portion of the nose. A septoplasty is done for medical necessity to improve airflow dynamics through the nose.
A rhinoplasty procedure is performed for cosmetic changes and can straighten the nose, remove the hump and adjust the tip cartilages as necessary.
For many examples of crooked nose repair in our practice, please see  the link below

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.