Tired Eyes at 25: Brow-lift or Blepharoplasty to Upper Lids? (photo)

Hello, I am a 25-year old female looking for a solution to my tired-looking eyes. I used to get compliments on my eyes all the time, but no longer, and I believe my upper lids are to blame. I also notice that it is harder to apply eyeshadow these days, especially in the crease area (or lack-thereof). I have attached a photo for reference. Would a brow-lift or a blepharoplasty better suit the situation? I can provide additional photos if needed. Any input is much appreciated! Thank you

Doctor Answers (16)

Correction of Deep Set Tired Eyes

+1

Based on the limited photo you provided it appears that you have  some mild excess upper lid skin and hollow upper lids in general. This can be improved with a conservative pinch blepharoplasty (just removing a little bit of skin) and fat or filler transfer to make your lids and brow less hollow which is a feature that typically comes with the aging process. Make sure you go to a board certified Plastic Surgeon or Oculoplastic Surgeon with experience in these techniques.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Brow lift or blepharoplasty

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The brow lift procedure is an acceptable procedure when patients have low set eyebrows.  The upper blepharoplasty will address excess skin on the upper eyelids quite easily without having to perform an entire brow lift.  It is important to be very conservative with the upper lids or brow lift.  With regards to the upper lids, the incision is hidden right in the crease of the upper eyelid where a small amount of excess skin is removed to get rid of the tired look.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Brow Lift or Upper Eyelid Blepharoplasty

+1

Although you do have some asymmetry of your brows, I would not recommend a brow lift. There is a minimal amount of excess upper eyelid skin, but I don't feel excision would improve your appearance. You have a high upper lid crease and a hallow appearance above that crease which gives you an 'aged' upper lid. Fillers to increase the convexity and fullness between the eyebrows and lid crease will provide a more youthful look.  

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Browlift or Blepharoplasty for Tired Eyes

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From the look of your pictures, it doesn't appear that you have significant brow droop.   We generally measure the brow position with respect to the bony brow ridge.  It appears your brow is a  few millimeters above which is normal.  It is difficult to tell this from a static photo and you are best served with an in office consultation to assess brow position.   An upper eyelid lift removes the excess skin and fat to contour the upper eyelid.   Patients may want an upper eyelid lift due to changes in the eyelids with aging or because of a congenital ("born with it") fullness to the upper lids. 

James C. Marotta, MD
Long Island Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Tired eyes may be corrected with injectable product

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Based on your photo, you have a small amount of excess upper eyelid skin. Please consult a board certified plastic surgeon before scheduling any surgery for this issue. You may find that Botox (or a similar product) or a filler like Juvederm may be all you need.

Donna Rich, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Tired Eyes at 25: Brow-lift or Blepharoplasty to Upper Lids?

+1

I have performed Brow Lifts and Blepharoplasty for over 20 years and IMHO, your upper eyelids have a slight amount of excess skin and would be helped with an upper eyelid surgery.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Browlift versus blepharoplasty for younger patient

+1

Just based upon the one photo you submitted, your eyebrows are in excellent position. It has a nice arch with the "foot" of the brow at the lateral or outside portion of the iris of your eye with tapering at the club or end of the brow. On the other hand you do have some excess upper eyelid skin that could easily be addressed by removing that typically under local anesthesia. I have had several younger patients like yourself who have a congenital amount of extra upper eyelid skin that makes them look tired and once it is removed you are set for many years if that is an issue for you. 

Scott Trimas, MD
Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Blepharoplasty vs. brow lift

+1

It is hard to tell exactly from your photo, but I do not see much skin redundancy in your upper lid. Although I would not qualify your brows as drooping, there is a downward arch to them on the outer aspect. Although this could be addressed with a brow lift, it is hard to recommend without an in-person evaluation. One option would be to try a brow lift with Botox to see if you like it before committing to a surgical brow lift.

Mark Samaha, MD
Montreal Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Multiple small changes may be the cause

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I certainly would be hesitant to suggest blepharoplasty or browlift surgery. You have ralative hollowness and a filler could add some upper lid fullness. In addition, a little Botox can raise your outer brow to see if this achieves the look you desire. Older photos would be helpful, too.

Frank P. Fechner, MD
Worcester Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Brow lift vs. Blepharoplasty

+1

From your photo, it is difficult to tell.  While most women seeking this surgery are older, it does appear that you have some redundancy of your upper eyelid skin.  An in-person consultation would be helpful in determining the cause and a solution that would work for you.  Best of luck!

Danielle DeLuca-Pytell, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.