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Bumps and Tightness After Canthopexy

I had upper and lower blepharoplasty 10 days ago with transcutaneous and canthopexy with lowers, no fat removal some skin removed. I have tight skin fold in one outside corner and bumps on both, but when I contract the muscle that pulls the nose sideways, I get a wrinkle from the outside corner of my left eye diagonal to my nostril. Sounds crazy but it looks like a tendon is pulling it; is this possible?

Doctor Answers (6)

Bumps are normal after canthopexy or canthoplasty

+1

The bumps in the outer corners of the eyes is a normal phenomenon after a canthopexy or canthoplasty. There are sutures underneath the area of the orbital rim, the lateral portion of the orbit, which are holding the new position of the eyelid in an upward fashion. Either permanent or dissolvable sutures can be used and in time the swelling will subside and the bumps should go away regardless of the suture used.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Do yourself and favor and stop looking in the mirror

+1

Do yourself a favor and stop looking in the mirror. You are very early post-op and you still have significant swelling and the tissues have not settled. In a few days to weeks, all of this will improve. You will save yourself much grief and distress by being patient and not over-analyzing everything in the mirror. Good luck with your recovery.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Relax, it has only been 10 days

+1

Most of us that do a significant amount of eyelid surgery understand that a majority of patients will "settle" in 5-7 days. However, when more extensive work is needed such as canthopexies or muscle plications the healing time is usually longer. The bumps are usually the tissue reaction to the sutures that are used in the corners for the canthopexy.

So with that said just relax, continue to use warm compresses. This increases blood flow to bring healing cells to the eyes. If you're still unhappy after 6 months then you can address it.

Christopher L. Hess, MD
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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You need time to heal after Canthopexy

+1

Dear Gaga,

You are very early from you surgical procedure. Things that are going on now are very likely to improve. Often doctors like to soft sell the surgery they are proposing to perform to avoid sounding negative. However, you had a very big lower eyelid surgery. It is interesting that your surgeon performed a transcutaneous lower eyelid procedure but only removed skin which is certainly possible. If this procedure truly only involved the removal of skin and the surgery did not violate the underlying muscle and septum, then presumably much of what you are aware of is due to swelling. This should settle down dramatically over the next 4 to 6 weeks.

If you are having a continued issue after that time, I suggest you contact the Realself community again and include a photo of your appearance at that time for further input.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Lower Blepharoplasty Bumps and Folds

+1

Without photographs it is difficult to give you specific advice. That being said, it is not unusual to have small bumps and folds 10 days after a lower blepharoplasty. These should slowly resolve over time. The wrinkle from your left eye to your nostril is also probably related to swelling and alterations in the normal activity of the obicularis oculi muscle and should also resolve with time.

Daniel Reichner, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

I doubt canthoplasty is creating the fold

+1

10 days is way too early to be concerned. The tissues must heal, relax, and re-adjust. It takes 3 months to be able to finally evaluate blepharoplasty results.

I doubt that your procedure could cause the fold or wrinkle you describe.

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.