Am I a Candidate for Invisalign for Teens?

My teeth are pretty bad but I don't want traditional braces because I ride horses and don't want to risk injuring my mouth more than I already do because of there being metal.

Doctor Answers (6)

I am a horse person too!!!

+3

Yours appears to be a complex case that shoudl be treated by an orthodontic specialist in order to acheive the best results.  Because of some limitations, Invisalign is likely not best for your situation.  You should know that people who do all kinds of activities, including contact sports, do just fine with braces.  As an avid horse person I don't see a whole lot of instances where your mouth would be hurt with your braces, unless a) you have an ill mannered horse that throws their head around, or b) you get tossed and hit the ground alot.   So yes, poor mannered horses and broncs are out.  Otherwise you should be fine.  Girls at my barn have braces (and are my patients too!)

Good luck.


Atlanta Orthodontist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Invisalign for severe crowding

+2

If you look at the photo of your upper teeth you can see that the cuspid tooth is completely overlaying the lateral incisor tooth, which is back in your palate.  This means that however you are treated there will be some major tooth movement with large movements of tooth root movement as well.  Such movements are best accomplished with braces, and there are tooth colored esthetic braces that would work well.  You can use a mouth guard to protect your lips during sports, so injuring your mouth with the braces is not really a worry.  Be sure to get a consultation with an orthodontic specialist who is expereinced with both braces and Invisalign to find out what the possiblities are for your case.  Sometimes you can do part of the job with Invisalign and part of it with braces (although this is more expensive).

Brian Povolny, DDS, PhD
Seattle Orthodontist
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Am I a Invisalign teen case

+2

From the looks of your pictures you seem to have a sever amount of crowding...Although it is almost always possible to treat crowded cases without extractions (either with braces or Invisalign)...this is often not the most esthetic or stable way to do things.  If you do need extractions, it is much more difficult (though not impossible ) to treat you with Invisalign. Without extractions you would be easier to treat with Invisalign,  but this is probably not the right treatment for you!

Robert Waxler, DMD, MS
Saint Louis Orthodontist

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Candidate for Invisalign for Teens

+2

From the pictures you sent, you appear to have a complex case and traditional orthodontics would be best. Invisalign may be possible, but would take a long time and more than one set of trays. Be sure to see an orthodontist or dentist with significant experience with traditional and invisalign orthodontics. Have fun with your horses.

Mickey Bernstein, DDS
Memphis Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Invisalign teen may not be the answer

+1

From what I can see from your pictures, I think a combination of functional orthodontic therapy (to expand the roof of your mouth without surgery) and then either conventional braces or Invisalign would be the best option for you.  It's impossible to tell without an exam of course, so I would recommend setting up a consultation with either an orthodontist or a dentist with orthodontic experience treating constricted jaws and severe crowding.

Gerilyn Alfe, DMD
Chicago Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Metal braces?

+1

Invisalign has its limitations and some cases will have a better final results if braces are placed. Most orthodontist consultations are free, they can show you different type of brackets they can use. Good luck and have fun with your horses!!

Pamela Marzban, DDS
Fairfax Cosmetic Dentist

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.