Is It Protocol to Use Some Type of Gel Before Laser Hair Removal Treatment?

I got burned from a laser hair removal treatment about 2 weeks ago. I believe it was because the nurse performing the treatment didnt use any type of lubricant she just put the hand held laser beam on my legs completely bare. My legs look awful and I'm very depressed my scars are healing a little but I think it may be permanent.

Doctor Answers (3)

Burns after laser hair removal

+1

Some lasers require gel  and some don't. You need to see the doctor for follow up. You can also consider a second opinion by an experienced specialist if you are not comfortable with the office where you had the treatment. Go to the American  Society for Lasers in Surgery and Medicine and find a member in your area. 


Sacramento Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Burns from laser hair removal

+1

Most of the lasers used for hair removal do not require the use of a gel. We use the GentleMAX laser by Candela which protects the skin during treatment by spraying a cryogen onto the skin a fraction of a second before each laser pulse. Laser hair removal can cause burns on the skin for various reasons which may occur even when optimal laser treatment parameters are used. Fortunately they are usually superficial and rarely cause scarring. Be careful to use a good sunscreen to protect the new skin from developing excess pigmentation. Hydroquinone cream may help if there is increased pigmentation that persists. 

Mitchell Schwartz, MD
South Burlington Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Laser Hair Removal and Gel

+1

Not all laser hair removal machines require gel application prior to use.  Burns on the legs can take some time to heal.  Please return to the place where you received the treatment so that your burns/marks may be evaluated and treated properly.

Sheri G. Feldman, MD
Beverly Hills Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

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