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Does the Nose Still Look Wider Six Months After Open Rhinoplasty?

Hi, I had an open rhinoplasty six months ago to remove a visible hump. Now am really glad to see my smooth concave profile. But my nose has become and looks so much more wider (than before) when seen from the front.It looks spongy and huge Also the tip has become much bigger than previously. Is this something to be worried about? Will my nose get back to its old narrow look sans bump? I have heard it takes more time to become narrow but I can feel something hard and bony when I touch the sides.Thank you.

Doctor Answers (3)

6 months post Rhinoplasty

+1

Hi,

It sounds like you have an open roof deformity and a persistant bulbous tip. I dont think your nose will change much at this point. Consider a revision if it bothers you.

 

Best,

Dr.S.


New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 211 reviews

Nasal widening after fracture reduction and septoplasty

+1

Without the details of your situation available - I'm speculating that you have some residual edema (swelling) of the nasal soft tissues - this frequently takes up to a year or longer to improve. You might also have some of the fractured portions of your nose fall of out 'reduction' - not healing in the position the parts are supposed to be in. Go see your rhinoplasty surgeon for a evaluation.

Scott C. Sattler, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Wide nose 6 months after rhinoplasty.

+1

Wide nose 6 months after rhinoplasty can be present. If it is still wide after 3 more months and has not gotten any smaller return to your surgeon or get a second opinion from an experienced revision rhinoplasty specialist.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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