Can the Nose Collapse After Revision Rhinoplasty with Ear Cartilage Grafts?

Hello, 8 months ago I had a revision rhinoplasty with ear cartilage grafts (my nose was over-resected and pinched after a previous rhinoplasty some years ago). Please tell me, is it possible that the nose can collapse after revision rhinoplasty with ear cartilage grafts? Can the grafts ever extrude ? And I have also twinges and slight pain where the grafts were placed, is this normal after 8 months?My surgeon says that there is nothing wrong and that I shouldn't worry. Thank you in advance.

Doctor Answers (3)

Ear cartilage graft prevent recollapse of the nose?

+1

Ear cartilage grafts should help support the nose and improve your tip pinching. It is very uncommon for cartilage grafts to extrude or lead to repeat nasal collapse.

Some people will note some occasional twinges of tenderness in the area of grafting as the nose heals.

 


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Possible Nasal Collapse after Revision Rhinoplasty

+1

It is possible but fortunately rare that a nose can collapse after a revision rhinoplasty whether or not ear cartilage grafts are used. It is very unlikely that the cartilage will extrude because the cartilage is living tissue that will become incorporated into the surrounding nasal structures.I would not worry about the twinges or slight pain.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Nasal collapse and Ear Carilage grafts

+1

Hi,

Nasal collapse and ear cartilage grafts or any grafts for that matter are not inter-related. Nasal collapse has to do with how the surgery was done by your surgeon. If you have no collapse at 8 months, it will probably be ok. Cartilage grafts should not extrude and the twinges you feel may still be some healing going on.

Best,

Dr.S.

Oleh Slupchynskyj, MD, FACS
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 217 reviews

You might also like...

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.