What is the Downtime and is There Any Scaring After a Removal of Malar Bags?

I am very hesitant about having any kind of procedure, very worried about the outcome and bruising and scaring after wards, how can I be reasured this is the best choice for me. However I do want to get rid of what I believe are called malar bags, they make me feel so old, my father and brother both have them. As you can tell I am on the fence about this whole thing, any advise you may offer would be greatly appreciated. I am 51 years old and have always been told I look like I am in my 30ies

Doctor Answers (2)

Removal of Malar Bags

+1

A Blepharoplasty that removes the malar bags requires more work than one on someone without the bags. This will slow total recovery slightly, but not enough to make any difference. There is a moderate amount of swelling and bruising, but both resolve rapidly or can be disguised. There are also some medications that can be taken around the surgery to reduce the bruising. (We put everyone on bromelain and arnica montana and remove most sutures by 3 days and all by a week. The swelling is down enough to go out in public with some make-up to cover the bruising and any redness of the scar by 4-5 days. After this procedure I was back seeing patients by 5 days with no one the wiser.) The scar is just under the eyelashes and out to the side in a normal crease and disappears within about 2 months. The only time you are really restricted is for the first 3 days where you should take it very easy to prevent any bleeding.

 


Highlands Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Downtime and Scarring after Removal of Malar Bags

+1

Allow yourself about 1 week before returning to normal activities after correction of malar bags. Scarring is minimal because the incision is placed in the thin lower eyelid skin.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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