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Is the Cheek Pad the Same As the Buccal Fat Pad? (photo)

is the cheek pad and the buccal fat pad the same thing? I had an substandard face-lift 15 months ago. It wrecked my eyes. One doctor wanted to lift my cheek pads along with another procedure, to give my eyes more support. My new doctor, considering a revision of my inadequate face-lift, spoke of removing the buccal fat pads. My face is round and I have puffy cheeks. I'm 60 years old. What do you suggest? I like my new doctor, but not sure about the buccal fat pad removal.

Doctor Answers (11)

Buccal Fat Removal and Cheek Pad

+1
There are multiple fat compartments within the cheek - the buccal fat pad is one distinct one. Removal of the buccal fat is recommended by some facelift surgeons and not favored by other.
Personally, I belong to the second group and I do not like removing the fat from the buccal region.

Web reference: http://www.faceliftboston.com/comprehensive-facial-rejuvenation.htm

Worcester Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Cheek Pad and Buccal Fat Pad

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The buccal fat pad is not the same thing as a cheek pad. In fact, this is a complex area that is surrounded by the role and importance of fat compartments. In general, the removal of the buccal fat pad is not recommended even if a patient has puffy cheeks as this can have long-term sequelae as fat can deform the face long-term.

Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Cheek Area Facial Fat Grafting anf Buccal Fat Pad Removal

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   You can augment the malar eminences with fat and remove the buccal fat pad, which is herniating at a lower point.  Find the plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs these procedures hundreds of times each year.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Web reference: http://www.hughesplasticsurgery.com/Face-and-Neck-Lift.php

Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 149 reviews

Cheek Pad the Same As the Buccal Fat Pad? No they are different

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The cheek pad usually refers to the malar fat pad which is more under your eyes. The buccal fat pad is lateral to the corners of your mouth. I would consider filling your face, this may seem parodoxical, instead of more face lifting. There are no ways of thinking that will change the way we approach facial rejuvenation.

Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Buccal fat and cheekpad fat are different

+1

I see you differently. Your buccal fat pads at the lower face are somewhat herniated and large. REMOVING THEM WOULD SHAPE YOUR FACE THINNER AND IS RECOMMENDED. RAISING YOUR MALAR FAT PADS UNDER YOUR EYES IS NOT RECOMMENDED. I WOULD USE FAT INJETIONS. THE AREA UNDER YOUR ETES NEEDS VOLUME AND THE MALAR FAT PADS HAVE NO VOLUME EVEN IF LIFTED

Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Cheek pad and buccal fat pad

+1

No they are not the same-although cheek is a lay term, the medical term for cheek is malar or melo

By saying cheek pad I think you are referring to the malar fat pad

this is an upside down triangle of fat that is relatively superficial,  just under the skin a and subcutaneous fat 

this must be elevated in facelifts in order to restore upper cheek fullness and to pull the bottom tip up off the mandible where it exists as the jowl

 

The buccal fat pads is deeper and slightly lower on the face 

removing some of it can narrow narrow the lower face thus turnning a round face into more of a heart shaped face

 

Do no take this as medical advice as I have not examined you but if you were to come to see me I would recommend a redo facelift as  your malar fat pad does not seem to bee elevated and supported.  Consider my comments general information only.

buccal fat pad reduction might work synergistically with that

best of luck 

work with a surgeon you trust 

Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

The cheek fat and buccal fat pad are not the same but both can create aesthetic problems.

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Patients can get fullness in the lower face as gravity pulls fat from the cheek downward.  It can be repositioned with a facelift.  The buccal fat pad is a separate entity that can contribute to volume in the cheek unrelated to age.  It is uncommonly a problem but can be treated under local anesthesia through the inside of the mouth.

Web reference: http://www.zubowicz.com

Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Fat cheeks

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These are one and the same and it is true that the buccal fat pads can make a face rounder.Soem people like that look.

Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Buccal Fat Pad Removal for Cheek Reduction

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Yes, buccal fat pads and cheek pads are the same. Buccal Fat Extraction is a surgical procedure in which the fat pads that fill the lower cheeks are removed. Some of this cheek fat can be removed through the inside of the mouth. Also called a cheek reduction, the result is a thinner looking face.

A common reason my patients undergo buccal fat pad extraction is that they have “chipmunk” or chubby cheeks. Buccal Fat Extraction can give a more rounded face a more desirable “chiseled” quality and accentuated cheekbones.

At our cosmetic surgery offices in Manhattan and Garden City, New York, I perform the buccal fat pad removal under local anesthesia with light sedation.

Web reference: http://realfacelift.com/surgical-procedures/cheek-reduction/

New York Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Is the Cheek Pad the Same As the Buccal Fat Pad?

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Thanks for posting photos. Yes you result is very average. And the ectropion of the lower lateral lids is noted. The "roundness" of you central aesthetic zone could be either buccal fat, cheek fat or both. A redirection mid face lift could help improve the appearance. I might consider buccal fat removal also. Regards and follow up would be nice. 

Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.