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What Are the Benefits of Restylane Versus Botox on tired eyes?

Which one of the products has less side effects? Restylane or Botox? Are patients happier with the results for tired eyes and dark circles when they use Restylane?

Doctor Answers (11)

Botox or Restylane

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Botox and Restylane are totally different and work by different means, both can be used to improve tired eyes though. The Restylane can be used to fill in the dark circles on the lower eyelid rim and the Botox can be used to elevate the eyebrow and make the eye look more open


Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox does not help dark circles

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Tired puffy dark eyelids are not treated well by Botox. Some people can benefit by an off-label use of Restylane to raise the tear trough below the eyelid and make it look smoother. However, if someone is puffy to begin with, if they actually have fluid filled bags of the lower eyelids, the Restylane could accentuate the puffiness as it absorbs some water molecules.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Botox and Restylane around the eyes

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Both of these products can and are used around the eyes.  However, they treat totally different things.  In my practice, we use Botox most commonly around the eyes and Restylane in the lower half of the face.  There are exceptions including a deep tear trough that fills nicely with Restylane.  In general, if you are looking for an injection that will help rejuvenate and refreshen around your eyes, go for Botox.  As always, make sure your surgeon specifically discusses what you should expect and have him show you some pictures.

John Bitner, MD
Salt Lake City Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

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What Are the Benefits of Restylane Versus Botox on tired eyes?

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Botox and Restylane are entirely different products with different effects and purposes.

Botox basically relaxes the injected muscles. This is excellent for the frown lines and crow's feet, but it would not make your eyes look less tired. Restylane is a filler and is used to elevate depressions or hollows in the face.

Tired looking eyes are usually from droopy upper eyelids, which requires removal of the extra skin. This procedure is called an upper lid blepharoplasty and can be done under local anesthesia.

Bags under the lower eyelids are also a very common cause of tired looking eyes. The bags cause a shadow under the eyes that people equate to dark circles. This must be addressed according to the individual problem. Sometimes bags are not present, but there is still a depression under the eyes causing the dark circles. In either case, Restylane is an excellent solution. It is used to fill the depression, which reduces the shadow. Virtually everyone eventually gets this problem with increasing age.

Technique for injecting under the eyes is critical. A soft point microcannula should be used to avoid bleeding and subsequent black eyes, and Restylane or any product must be injected with only drops per needle or cannula pass at a time into each area to avoid lumps. Patients are usually elated with the results, and the procedure only takes 20-30 minutes. Black eyes, when using the microcannular, are rare.

E. Ronald Finger, MD
Savannah Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

What Are the Benefits of Restylane Versus Botox on tired eyes?

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Interesting question.  perhaps it's best to ask why your eyes appear tired?  If there's excess fat, Botox will have zero effect as it reduces lines and wrinkles.  In fact, Botox may weaken the lower eyelid muscle making it appear droopy.  In that case you'd have a tired, droopy eye...not an aesthetic improvement.  Restylane can be injected to soften the edges of the fat bags but since all fillers add volume (not decrease it) the bags and fullness will actually be larger, not smaller.  

A lower eyelid surgery would remove the fat bags making the eyes appear less tired and more attractive.  For dark circles, chemical peels can be helpful.  Be sure to select an MD or plastic and cosmetic surgeon that understands and follows the proper aesthetics of facial beauty.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Restylane vs Botox for tired eyes

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Restylane and botox serve completely different purpose but they work well together. Restylane is for wrinkle at rest (those that don't go away when you don't move your facial muscles). Botox is for dynamic lines (those that move when you smile, frown, etc). See your local dermatologist and consider getting both products for optimal results. Peels and laser resurfacing should also be considered.

Gary Goldenberg, MD
New York Dermatologist

Restylane vs Botox for tired eyes

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Restylane and Botox work in different ways and are usually used in different areas around the eyelids.  Restylane is a hyaluronic acid filler and is best used to fill in depressions and deeper wrinkles.  In the eyelid area, Restylane is most commonly used to fill in the tear trough area in the medial, lower eyelid.  Botox, on the other hand,is a neuromodulator.  It acts to paralyze small muscles around the eyelids.  Botox is most commonly used to treat the frown lines over the bridge of the nose and the "crows feet" area lateral to the eyes.  Both medications work well in their respective areas, however, the effects of both do wear off and the injections do need to be repeated.  For Botox the effect lasts approximately 3-4 months, for Restylane the effect lasts approximately 6-12 months.  If there is a significant amount of loose or sagging skin and/or prominent or bulging fat pads around the eyelids, then one may be a better candidate for eyelid surgery (blepharoplasty).

Vincent D. Lepore, MD
San Jose Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Restylane vs. Botox for Tired Eyes

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Hello.  Botox is typically not used for tired eyes or dark circles.  The "tear trough" injection procedure which can help with dark circles, skin laxity (slight bags) and sunken eyes uses Restylane.  Botox is a neurotoxin that softens lines by relaxing muscles that cause them.  Under the eye, filler is needed and our preferred product is Restylane.

Make sure to find an injector that uses an injection technique referred to as "under the muscle" as some do not and this can lead to larger bags under the eyes.  To see results of the procedure, you can visit the link below on our website.

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox vs. Restylane for Tired Eyes.....

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Botox vs. Restylane:  These are two completely different products.  Botox, relaxes the muscle movements around the eye.  Restylane, fills in wrinkles and hollows under the eyes.  Both have a purpose for enhancing a more "youthful eye".  However, one does not and can not take the place of the other product. 

I would highly recommend you go to an experienced injector to get this area on your face treated.  Less is more and getting a "natural" look is the key.

Good luck.  Hope this helps.

Dr. Grant Stevens      

Grant Stevens, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 65 reviews

Restylane versus Botox around the Eyes

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Restylane/Juvederm and Botox are used for different purposes, so there is not a direct way to answer your question as it is not a choice between the two produce, but which product (or both) are most appropriate of your issues.  If you post a picture, we may be able to give you specific advice.  In general, Botox is used to soften dynamic wrinkles around the eyes and on the forehead.  So Botox softens wrinkles that you make when you squint, frown and raise your eyebrows.  Fillers, such as Restylane and Juvederm, are used around the eyes to fill volume deficits.  This can be under your lower lid to help soften the lid/cheek junction, around the orbital rim to help soften the appearance of the eye socket, and in the upper lid to help restore lost shape and volume.  You really need to be seen in person for a full evaluation since there are many options but also limitations to what fillers can do.  You may actually need some other produce or procedure to solve your problem.

 

Good Luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.