Will Less Than 200cc Be Too Small?

Finally decided to take the plunge and started playing with sizers. It was fun, but also confusing. I'm 5'1" and 95lbs, barely 32A, with a thin frame. Based on placing the sizers in a bra top, it seems like even less than 200cc silicone implants were making a big difference on me. Does that seem right? My friend (exact same body type) has 260cc silicone implants and has the look I want. Should I be worried about the potential difference in cc? (Note: My friend was 32A and is now a small C.)

Doctor Answers (11)

Will Less Than 200cc Be Too Small?

+1

At 5'1" and 95lbs, barely 32A, with a thin frame it is possible that you would be happy with a 200 cc implant. The optimal solution would be to determine the dimensions of the implant to be used and mark that out on your breast. Projection of the implant will vary depending on what implant projection is selected (high, moderate, etc.). Assuming the implants are going to be placed under the chest wall muscle, there will be a decrease in some of the projection that you see when trying the implants on in a bra. If you have the same size frame as your friend, the 260 CC (or similar) implant when placed under the muscle may give you the projection and appearance that you see with 200 cc's in a bra.

Good luck with your surgery! Michael Sadove, MD


Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Selecting the size for you

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When selecting size it is important to take into account the base width of the breast.  This can vary from person to person- even those with the same weight/body type.  Speak with your plastic surgeon who can help you evaluate different sizes based on your breast width and surgery goals.  Good luck!

Mennen T. Gallas, MD
Katy Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Cosmetic Surgery is an Art and a Science

+1

You are moving in the right direction. Check out the test size implants before your surgery. Don't worry about your friend. This is a personal choice. All the best

Thomas A. Narsete, MD
Greenwood Village Plastic Surgeon

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Choosing your implants

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Hello. The most important factors for determining the size of implants that could be used on a patient include width of the base of the breast, the size of your thorax and the amount of breast tissue and skin you have. Once a surgeon has this information he could better educate you on what type of implants would work best for you. Implants do look smaller once in the pocket especially if placed under the muscle. This could explain your confusion when comparing the sizers with your friend’s implants.
Jaime Perez, MD
Breast Augmentation Specialist
Plastic Surgery Center of Tampa

Jaime Perez, MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

200 cc implants

+1

Sizers can give a rough idea of the volume you want.  An exam in person is essential to properly size  you.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Sizers are Helpful but......

+1

Sizers are a decent way to gain some perspective on the patient's desired size. I remind patients that the sizes is placed on top of the skin of the breast.  The implant is not being influenced by the muscle and skin so what every size is desirable then ad at least 50 cc to that volume.  In your case at least a 250 cc implant size should be considered to achieve your desired result.

Best Wishes

Dr ES

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

200 cc. implants

+1

It is a common misconception that implant size is chosen by volume. In fact, the volume is the result of choosing your implants by dimensions: that is, the diameter and the profile or projection. This can only be done by examining your breasts, taking measurements of the base diameter and projecting the appropriate diameter and profile that will produce the results you desire.  Often there are compromises to be made due to unwanted side effects like rippling, excessive roundness, or mismatch with your natural breast.

Robin T.W. Yuan, M. D.

Robin T.W. Yuan, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

You should probably go bigger than 200 cc.

+1

As you have found, trying to figure out the right implant size is not an exact science.  Many different methods are used and each has their limitations.  General guidelines that I recommend:  1) Most patients feel that they "should have gone bigger"  for some time after surgery.  It is not very common for women to feel like they are too big.  2) If the sizer you are using is an implant, it will look larger in the bra than in the body, so go a little larger, say 25 to 50 cc more volume.    3)  200 cc is a relatively conservative implant in my state (New Mexico) even for a petite woman like you.  4) Your friends breast and body proportions may not be a good guide for you.  A skilled surgeon may be a better resource for guiding your choice.  I hope this information helps.

Michael S. Hopkins, MD
Albuquerque Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Most women wish they had gone a bit bigger when interviewed a year after breast augmentation.

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The average implant using my practice is around 300 mL. 200 mL is very small implant. Nevertheless, this does not mean it's not right for you. The only caveat would be that the vast majority of women who have breast augmentation wish they'd gone a bit bigger after they have become accustomed to the new breast size.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Less Than 200 cc Too Small for Breast Implants

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    The implants will be blunted to an extent by going under the muscle.  You may want to add 50 or so cc, but you will hear different opinions on this.   In smaller women 175 cc may increase by one cup size.  So 350 cc would increase by 2 cup sizes.  250 or 260 cc would be somewhere in the middle.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 218 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.