Open Capsulotomy Didn't Fix my Problem. What to Do Now?

I just recently (1 week to be exact) had a open capsulotomy and i was advised by my PS to use the strap for atleast 3 weeks for my left breast to settle like my right one. The problem is I really don't see a difference, the upperpole is still noticiable on my left breast.. I'm really depressed, I feel like nothing is fixing the problem. I have 550cc silicone implants under the muscle, has them done 10 months ago.

Doctor Answers (7)

Early capsulotomy results disappointing

+1

Doctors may have different opinions, and experiences, and here are mine.  I have had patients just like you over the years and more times than not, with patience, things are just fine.  I make it a point to inform patients several times not to expect the implants to start to drop before between 3 and 4 weeks after surgery, and sometimes longer.  And this is with a band.   I have found that when I forgot to drive this very important point home BEFOREHAND, patients expect to look perfect in the recovery room.  They see that things really look "funny" and are needlessly upset.  To make matters worse, at this point, my credibility is much less, so I am not as able to reassure my patient.

So though I haven't been able to examine you etc., let me assure you that you have an excellent chance to get a great result, but you have to know that things really do take around 3 or 4 weeks to just start to look good, and sometimes longer.  It may take over a year for the final result.

 

sek


Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Breast capsule issue

+1

Capsulotomy for a capsular contracture is often not the best way to treat a contracture. However, sometimes it is difficult to remove the entire capsule.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Breast shape problems after a segmental capsule release

+1

You developed a capsular contracture and had a capsule tommy or scoring of the capsule this may have only been do in the inferior segment to get that breast to drop in to a better position.  Give it some time, if this is not successful after 3-6 months then you may consider a capsulectomy or removal of the entire capsule.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Capsulotomy not working, now what

+1

If you are talking about capsular contracture, capsulolomy is effective, though capsule recurrence is seen half of the time. If your issue was reposition of a high implant, you should wear the band and wait things out before you decide what is next.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Revision

+1

It will take 6-12 weeks for the tissues to stretch and allow the implant to drop. It may or may not be successful, but you need to wear the band and give it a chance.

Gregory Sexton, MD
Columbia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Capsulotomy vs capsulectomy

+1

I assume you are talking about a capsular contracture problem here.  In some minor cases, a capsulotomy (cutting the capsule like splitting a tomato over a flame) is enough and in more severe cases a capsulectomy (removal of the capsule and placement of a new implant) is best. Maybe you need to discuss further with your doctor.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Open Capsulotomy Didn't Fix my Problem. What to Do Now?

+1

Without looking at photos, I find it impossible to make any suggestion other than to follow your surgeon's instructions. Getting a second opinion is another alternative, though nothing would likely be offered without waiting several months to see if the implant doesn't drop. It would be helpful to know if the surgeon felt these looked even in the operating room. If so, I wouldn't give up hope!

All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.