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Will Teeth Grinding Affect Rhinoplasty Result?

Grinding teeth after Rhinoplasty. I grind my teeth while I sleep. Will this have an adverse affect on my healing/development after rhinoplasty surgery?

Doctor Answers (3)

Teeth grinding will not affect rhinoplasty results

+1

The grinding of teeth during your sleep will not affect the results from rhinoplasty. It is probably important to get a dental night block made from your dentist so as to prevent any further wear and tear on your teeth.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

No it won't.

+1

 However, it would be a good idea to get a dentist to make you a night guard to sleep with. This will prevent long term wear on your teeth.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Teeth Grinding after Rhinoplasty

+1

Hi Southeast22,

Many people grind their teeth, and this behavior is called "bruxism". Typically, bruxism puts undue strain on the jaw joints which can lead to a well-known condition called "TMJ" or "TMD" (temporomandibular dysfunction).

Fortunately, the nose is largely unaffected by bruxism and immune to the masticatory (chewing) forces transmitted through the jaws during grinding. Therefore, there should be NO detrimental effect to your nose after healing from a rhinoplasty. Simply let your surgeon know, so if you need a muscle relaxant after surgery, he could prescribe one. Warm compresses and soft diet also help.

Additional advice for the long haul is that you should consider seeking out an oral surgeon or dentist who is a TMJ expert and can make you a bite guard to protect your teeth and jaw joints from unneccessary wear and tear! Good luck!

Randolph Capone, MD
Baltimore Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.