Tear Drop or Round Implants?

I am 42 years old, breast fed two babies and very lean, hardly any breast tissue or body fat. I'm considering an augmentation to bring my not even a cup breasts up to a full c.Due to the fact that i want a natural look i was considering tear drop implants but have been reading about the high chance of them rotating and looking distorted...any thoughts?

Doctor Answers (11)

Shaped implants are a great option for the right patients

+2

I think the shaped implants are a great option for the right patient.  To me, that patient is someone with thin tissues, small volume breasts, and the desire to avoid a prominent upper pole contour or round shape to the breasts   - the so called "Baywatch breast."  You sound like someone I would consider the use of the shaped implant for. I prefer the Sientra implants because I find that the gel is a bit softer and more natural feeling than the Allergan implant, the shell is more supple, and the texturing is not as aggressive.  All shaped implants are textured, and this is done to help control position and rotation.  The most important factor in controlling rotation however, is proper design and creation of the implant pocket by the surgeon.  I have had no problems with rotation using these implants.  In fact, I can tell you that once the implant is placed in a properly dissected pocket, it is hard to make even small adjustments in position because of the texturing.  This suggests to me that it is highly unlikely that the implant will just spontaneously rotate significantly after surgery.  I typically place a supportive strap on my patients to control upper pole position for a week or two postoperatively, and this I believe helps too.  I have not found the need for drains in these cases, rather again, meticulous technique and control of bleeding at surgery makes this unnecessary in my opinion.  I have many happy patients with shaped implants in their breasts, and I foresee using them for years to come in the right patients.  Best of luck.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Tear Drop Breast Implants

+1
Shaped, form stable breast implants are the new and much improved version of early shaped breast implants. Biodimensional planning techniques can help your doctor determine whether these implants are right for you. 

Michael Law, MD
Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Round or Tear Drop Implants for Breast Augmentation

+1

   The majority of implants placed in the US are round.  It is true that the anatomic implants always have the potential for rotating and creating a contour issue.  You can achieve natural results with round implants, so I find very little use for the anatomic implants.  Kenneth Hughes, MD breast augmentation Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 192 reviews

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Style of implant

+1

I prefer to use the tear drop shape only for patients who are very tall and have a long chest wall and torso. The round implants assume a tear drop shape when standing.

Norman Bakshandeh, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Tear Drop or Round Gel Implants?

+1

Hello.

Thank you for your post.

There is no simple answer to your question without a physical examination.

Nonetheless, it is true that tear drop implants have a high rate of distortion and undesired displacements when compared to the round shaped gel implants.

It seems that your goal is the NATURAL look of the tear shaped breasts when standing; this could be achieved with the round gel implants without the increased risks of distortions that the patient and the surgeon have to deal with when considering the tear drop shaped implants.

That being said, please remember that commendable results require an exceptionally skilled surgeon to perform the surgery and settling for anything less than that increases the chances of additional corrective surgeries dramatically.
I hope this helps and please feel free to check the website below.

The best of luck to you.

Dr. Sajjadian

Ali Sajjadian, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 117 reviews

Tear Drop vs. Round Implants

+1

The implant shape is only one part of the equation to achieve a natural shape.   Important variables include pocket dissection/formation and implant placement.  To achieve natural shapes in many body types, I prefer a dual plane technique where the upper half or two-thirds of the implant is under the muscle.  However, a formal physical exam would be needed to make specific recommendations. Please visit with a board certified PS to learn more about your options.

Best wishes,

Dr. Basu

Houston, TX

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 115 reviews

Tear Drop or Round Implants?

+1

Most surgeons who practiced through the last generation of tear drop shaped implants have seen many rotated implants with resulting distortion and asymmetry. I saw another last week in the office. 

When you consider that the breast has a tear drop shape, remember that is in the standing position, with a gravity assist. If you hold a gel implant against a firm surface (like a chest wall), gravity will act and you will see a tear drop shape of the gel. 

I would favor smooth round gel implants. Thanks for your question, best wishes. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Round implants under the muscle

+1

I have many patients very similar "anatomically" to what you describe and I perform very natural breast augmentation.  I prefer round silicone gel implants under the muscle.  I think tear drop or "anatomic" implants can also be very good; however, they can rotate can cause tissue distortion which obligates that patient to another surgery.  The 410 implant is very hard and in my opinion, it doesn't feel breast like.  The new Sientra anatomic implants are a bit softer and if you select an anatomic that would be my suggestion. I hope this helps!

James F. Boynton, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Teardrop around implants?

+1

Thank you for your question.  This is certainly a matter of opinion but I will share mine with you.

Teardrops for breast augmentation came out of a number of years ago with the goal of providing what was hopefully a more natural-looking implant.  Teardrop implants are textured so that they stick inside to prevent the teardrop from turning sideways.

I personally do not favor a teardrop implants for cosmetic augmentation.  I find that the texturing makes them more feelable underneath the skin.  Despite the texturing they will on occasion rotate within the implant pocket and look even less natural.

I tend to favor a smooth round silicone implant for patients who are looking for a natural result.  While the round silicone implant is not technically a teardrop, the gel inside the implant tends to gravitate towards the bottom and give a more tear drop look. If a round implant rotates inside of you it will not make a difference and the gel will still gravitate towards the bottom.

I would recommend you look at these implants that your board certified plastic surgeon and feel them as well.

 

Best wishes.

Adam Tattelbaum, MD
Washington DC Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Tear Drop vs Round Breast Implants

+1

As it turns out, the round breast takes on a teardrop shape when you stand up not much different from the teardrop implant. The difference comes when you lay on your back. The round implant becomes round like a natural breast when you lay on your back. The teardrop implant stays teardrop in all positions. Therefore, when you look at all positions, it is a no brainer that the round implant is more natural looking. In addition, a teardrop implant can turn to the wrong  position, then it looks really bad. The smooth round implant also glides around more like a natural breast unlike the textured teardrop implant.If you pick an appropriate size implant, the round implant will look very natural.

Michael Horn, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.