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Taping Nose Post-rhino, Will The peeling Away Effect The Healing Shape?

After nose-lengthening with septal and ear grafts on tip, my supratip is less defined than i would like it at 7 weeks post-op. decided to tape it a little . asked my doc via email and he said ok.first time i tried, i removed and replaced new 3M translucent tapes four times consecutively as i was trying to get it done right. will the high level of stickines affect the nose as i peel tape away? at 7 weeks, is it ok to assume that unless there's pain,my nose results will not be affected?

Doctor Answers (7)

Taping nose after Rhinoplasty

+1

Yes, I don't think that taping the nose that far out from your procedure will do all that much to improve the aesthetics of your nose.  Taping of the nose is usually done in the first week of Rhinoplasty.


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Taping the nose after rhinoplasty

+1

Thank you for your question. The degree of stickiness due to residual adhesive on the nasal skin should not affect your healing. Certainly follow the postoperative advice of your nasal surgeon. At 7 weeks after surgery, experiencing pain can be a sign that you may be doing something injurious to your nose. In that case, alert your surgeon. I hope that helps. Good luck.

James M. Pearson, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

The tape?

+1

I never use the tape or any sort of pressure after the first week.  The reason is because I don't think it applies any pressure as the face moves through out the day.  

Andre Aboolian, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

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Taping Nose Post Rhinoplasty

+1

Taping your nose 7 weeks after rhinoplasty will do no harm, except possibly  irritating the skin - use paper tape as recommended by othes responding to your question. I'm not optimistic that it will be beneficial.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Taping the nose

+1

Taping the nose will rarely cause any problems (other than acne if used for too long).  The best tape to use is paper tape and the best way to take it off is in the shower after getting it wet

Sam Naficy, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 139 reviews

Taping the nose post Rhinoplasty is not worth the time

+1

  IMHO after performing Rhinoplasty for over 20 years, having patients apply tape to their nose after the Rhinoplasty...during the healing stage is a waste of time and I no longer have them do this.  There's no spring or tension, in the tape that's appled, so minutes after you put it on the nose....there's no pressure any longer on the skin and the swelling comes right back.  Unfortunately, it's a fact of simple physiology.

 Instead, I teach every Rhinoplasty patient how to effectively place pressure on the nasal skin performing manual lymphatic drainage which removes swelling from the area.  Beginning at 1 month, after the Rhinoplasty, this is performed every day for about 5 minutes and gives the patient the ability to remove excess swelling and localised irregularities in the nose.  Thin skinned, first time Rhinoplasty patients typically need to do this for 3-5 months and Revision Rhinoplasty and thick skinned patients for 12 -18 months.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Tape ok

+1

You should be ok, but just to be on the safe side, you may want to use the less sticky, paper tape.  Theoretically, if you consistently pulled the skin up over and over again it could be a problem.  The key is the compression, not the stickiness of the tape.  if your nose gets irritated, give it a break for a day or two.
 

Colin D. Pero, MD

Colin Pero, MD
Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.