My areola/nipples sit high 3 months post-op (photos)

I'm nearly 3 months post op and I can already tell I'm not happy where my areola/nipples sit I can only imagine the time they still have to drop. I'll be getting a revision due to scarring (left one still trying to close an open wound) my question is will an anchor lift help location of areola/nipple? I know I have to wait 6 months-1 year for revision.

Doctor Answers (5)

See your surgeon

+1
The photos are a bit difficult as they are shot from below with your arms above your head. Waiting is the correct thing to do. If you feel like your nipple position is undesirable at that point, your surgeon has ways to adjust their position. Let your surgeon monitor your progress and continue to be patient.


Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Breast issue?

+1
First, the arms have to be at your side in the photos, second it is hard to look at you other photos when it looks like the camera is shooting from below, which will make the nipple-areola appear high.  Best to be seen in person.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

BBA

+1
The photos need to be taken with your arms at your side.  Having said that, I see what you're describing.  If you're still unhappy 6-12 months post-op, a revision could help.  See your PS.

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

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Correction of High Nipple Areola 3 months after lift

+1
Thanks for your photos and question.

It is often difficult to give an accurate analysis of early post surgery results, and the angle in which photos are taken can at times make analyzing symmetry and relative nipple position difficult.  I recommend continued follow up with your plastic surgeon to discuss your concerns.

I have seen a variety of revisionary breast cases referred to me, and it certainly is possible to correct nipples that are "riding high".  I believe lowering the nipple areola complex in these cases does require correction in a transverse plane.  This can be achieve by converting a purely vertical mastopexy to an inverted-T or anchor pattern to better position the nipple areola complex on the breast mound.



Steven M. Camp, MD
Fort Worth Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

The short answer is yes, it will help...just not sure you'll need it.

+1
Its a little tough to give you definitive advice based on your pics but in answer to your question, if, after a year, you need to move the position of your nipple an anchor procedure will do the job.  Good luck.

Robert Frank, MD
Munster Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

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