Would Mastopexy Be Needed with Breast Implant Explantation? (photo)

I'm 61 y/o with 25 plus yr. old silicone implants placed subglandular. I am tall and very thin. I am not replacing the implants, but have had 2 opinions on needing a breast lift. One P.S. said I need one and the other said I do not need one. Any opinions looking at my photo? Is it best to wait or do Mastopexy at the same time of explantation? I am having pain so would like to proceed soon. Hope the photo helps with any opinions? Thank you!

Doctor Answers (12)

Lift post removal

+3

I think you should remove them.You will have maybe pseudoptosis where the breast looks flat and deflated but you are 61 and may not care.Remove them and if you are happy case closed and if not then a lift.


Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Explantation and a breast lift.

+2

My approach to this question is to stage the operations. Explantation will lead to a degree of contraction over 3-6 months which may eliminate the need for a lift and the scars that go with it. Even if a lift does continue to be necessary, many times the degree of lift is lessened and thus the scars may be fewer. Of course, there are instances where a lift is obviously needed. In your case, going on your photos alone, I would recommend staging the two 6 months apart.

David Bogue, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Would Mastopexy Be Needed with Breast Implant Explantation?

+2

There are a number of factors that contribute to whether a lift is beneficial at the time of explanation. Large implants and small amount of breast tissue is one setting where a lift will be advisable. Need for a lift even before the implants are taken out is another. 

Largely unpredictable is how much skin shrinkage is likely to occur.

Based on your photo, with the completely normal nipple/areolar position, I would suggest going with the explantation alone, and see what happens over the recovery period before deciding about a lift. 

All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

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Mastopexy After Implant Removal

+2

Thank you for your question.  From the pictures it's difficult to assess how much breast tissue you have versus how much is implant and what the quality of your skin is like.  It also sounds like you have a fairly significant capsular contracture.  With extensive capsulectomies in thinner skinned patients, sometimes it's safer to wait 6 months and then do the lift if it is necessary.  Sometimes, a "wait and see" approach is better if it isn't clearly obvious that a lift will be needed. 

 

 

Brian Joseph, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

After breast implant removal mastopexy might be needed to restore youthful shape to the breast

+2

Basic measurements of the breast taken by your plastic surgeon will in large part determine if a mastopexy is needed after breast implant removal. These are not guaranteed but should give you good idea of what is the best surgical solution.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Do I need a breast lift if my implants are removed?

+2

This is a question that depends not only on your anatomy (thickness of your tissue, laxity of your skin, etc.) and as equally important what you hope to achieve. With your implants removed in addition to the tissue around the implant called the capsule, your breast will sag and have much less upper breast fullness. You can always chose to have a lift at a later date if you decide to. I would recommend you speak with your board-certified plastic surgeon about what is best for you.

I hope this helps.

Dr. Edwards

Michael C. Edwards, MD, FACS
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Mastopexy After Implant Removal?

+2

Thanks for the question.  This is a very subjective scenario and there is no clear answer in your particular case based on your photos.  In these situations, I always encourage women to have the implants removed and wait at least six months to see if they then have the desire for a breast lift.  If it is clear from the get-go that a lift is needed, I will do both simultaneously.  Best wishes!

Brian Howard, MD
Alpharetta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

25-year-old silicone breast implants

+1

Thank you for your question and posting the picture.  Before undergoing any surgical procedure I would recommend seeing get board-certified plastic surgeon with expertise in this area who will then order an MRI of you breasts preoperatively. Since you have complaints of pain in your breasts the possibility of a leak in one or both breasts must be ruled out preoperatively. Depending on the findings of the MRI the surgical procedure performed will include replacing implants and placing new ones under the muscle or removing the implants that you currently have and staging the possible lift procedure for at least three months postoperatively.

Kevin Tehrani, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Would Mastopexy Be Needed with Breast Implant Explantation?

+1

Many women find they are not happy with their appearance after removal of breast implants.  A lift may or may not be the answer.  You might consider replacement of your old implants with new ones if pain relief is your primary concern.  Photos suggest some capsular contracture, which can cause pain.  That may be relieved by capsulectomy and re-augmentation.  This would almost certainly avoid the issue of mastopexy, since your breasts are not sagging.  Ask yourself if you would be happy if your breasts were soft and free of pain.

Mark D. Ball, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Lift or not

+1

Based on your photos and the fact that your nipples are not too low right now, I'd suggest getting the implants out and waiting 6 months for all the tissue shrinkage you can get.  At that point if you are not happy, maybe a lift would be in order.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.