How long is it normal to produce breast milk after surgery?

I had my BA aug 29, I had a rare side affect of producing milk (no funky smell, or green fluid), I have now stopped producing white milk but if I squeeze my nipples clear fluid comes out. I am not too worried about it I just wonder how long after my BA I should start being concerned. Just for a little back ground I did breast feed my son for 7 months but that was 3 years ago, I have no pain or tenderness in my breast at all, besides my incision (crease line incision) area sometimes.

Doctor Answers (5)

Breast milk after surgery

+2
It is unusual to produce breast milk after surgery but this milk can be left over from recent breast feeding. Definitely check in with your plastic surgeon.


Wellesley Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Galactorhea

+2

Milk production following an augmentation is not unusual as the stretching of the breast tissue in some women signals to the brain to begin to produce milk.. It should stop on its own but if it does not and you appear to have had it for a while I would see my surgeon or a gynecologist to have it worked up

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Brea Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Breast Surgery

+2

You have an interesting side effect of breast surgery called galactorrhea I often quote this as possible but have never seen it, it is benign but I would have you see a breast surgeon for some more information

Ryan Neinstein, MD, FRCSC
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

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Breast Milk Production After Breast Augmentation - How Long Should It Last?

+2

It appears you had true lactation after your breast augmentation. This production of milk from the breast is secondary to a number of processes. Implants placed under the breast tissue or under the muscle squeeze on the breasts and its ducts, forcing fluid in the glands out into the ducts and then into the nipples.

This occurs less than 20% of the time and resolves within a week or two. In more dramatic cases, this swelling of the breasts and pressure can lead to a feedback loop from the posterior pituitary leading to extended lactation greater than one month.

It appears that your original lactation was short-lived, and that it resolved itself spontaneously. Presently, you are experiencing some clear fluid production from your nipples upon manipulation. This is very common in some women even without breast augmentation. Your breast glands produce clear fluid regularly. Some of this gets into the ducts and then the nipple. This also is not an abnormal condition, and with time, it should resolve.

There is no absolute time that can be quoted for the resolution of lactation or the clear fluid production that you are presently experiencing. Your plastic surgeon should be kept in the loop, and he or she may even have a protocol on how to deal with this problem.

If you were my patient, I often prescribe a short course of Parlodel (Bromocriptine). This is a dopamine agnoist that is used in the treatment of pituitary tumors. If a five day course of Parlodel does not cure lactation greater than one month, I would then refer you to an endocrinologist for further studies and treatment.

S. Larry Schlesinger, MD, FACS
Honolulu Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 213 reviews

Milk After Breast Augmentation

+1

Thank You for Your Question. Milk production after breast augmentation is unusual but can't happen especially following breast feeding and having breast augmentation. Following breast feeding some milk can stay in the ducts for a long time and the pressure of the breast implant on the breast gland can force the milk out.

In most cases this is nothing to worry about. Of course you should be examined by your plastic surgeon and express your concerns.

I would avoid expressing the fluid out of your breasts to avoid irritation.

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.