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Im very tall and thin I've desided to get 650cc will it be a good size for me?

I'm 36 years old and I'm 6" and 135-140 lbs I wear a 34 A and I really want a large D or DD not much bigger then that thou, do you think 650cc will achive what Im looking for. Also I have a rare connective tissue disorder (ehlers - danlos syndrome) and would like to know if anyone has experience doing breast implants in patients with eds and what the final outcome was. Good or bad I'd like to know your results and expert opinion on do implants on patients with eds.

Doctor Answers (13)

Avoid over implantation

+1
At size 34 A each 100 cc’s of implant corresponds to 1 cup size change.To achieve a D would require 300 cc implants.650 cc implants are large, will not fit retro-pectoral, will extrude inferiorly and laterally requiring revision.650 cc implants weigh over 1 lb each and can lead to neck, back or shoulder pain.You need to reconsider the size of the implants you desire.


Best Wishes,

Gary Horndeski, M.D.


Texas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 123 reviews

Right size breast implants

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Thank you for your question about the right size breast implants.

You are tall, slim, with little breast tissue and your skin looks fairly tight. Plus you have Ehlers Danlos Syndrome which affects your connective tissue strength.

If you have a 650 cc implant,I believe that in 12 months, you will have considerable sagging of your tissues.
If you were my patient, I would suggest a compromise with a full implant, perhaps in the 400 cc range, but not one so large as 650.

See a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon and discuss your options and be ready to compromise between having larger than normal breasts - and a result that will be enduring. Best wishes.

Elizabeth Morgan, MD, PhD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

650 cc breast implants are too large for a thin woman with little breast tissue

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Thank you for your question and photograph.  Based on your photograph I think 650 cc breast implants are way too large for you.  Especially because you are thin and have a small amount of breast tissue, 650 cc breast implants will stretch and deform your chest and breasts.  The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome may also contribute to sagging.

Please undergo a breast implant sizing system evaluation and in detail consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon.  I agree that breast implants no larger than 350-400 cc be appropriate.

To learn more about how to size breast implants in cc please read the following link:

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

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Breast implants

+1
I feel that 650 cc implants are much too large for you.  The fact that you have Ehlers-Danlos makes using large implants an especially bad idea.  The larger implants will make your breasts much more likely to sag and the skin thin out with time.  If you stick with about 400 cc's, you will get a beautiful result that will hold up better over the long term.

Ronald J. Edelson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Breast aug

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Thank you for the pictures.



Base on these, I would suggest a 250- 300 cc implant to start creating the breast and have the tissue expand as well. I wouldn't recommend larger implants.


Dr. Campos


Jaime Campos Leon, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 140 reviews

650cc implants, tall and thin with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

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You do not mention which type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome you have. Depending on the type, surgery can be associated with excessive bruising, or poor wound healing and bad scars. I think 650cc implants into a 34A cup would be ill-advised, not just from your EDS point of view, but also in aesthetic terms (even considering your height).

Roy Ng, FRCS(Plast)
London Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Breast augmentation with 650cc implants

+1
Dear Anna,
  Thanks for submitting your pictures. From your pictures, you appear to be a very small A cup. Being a 34 very small A cup, a 650 cc implants will increase your breasts size by a little over 4 sizes. That will give you  a size of 34 DD. Would I recommend it to my patients in first setting considering your measurments ?  Most likely not. The bigger the implants in thin person, the more likely it is to have palpability of the implants and rippling. Also, it might take a very long time for the implants to settle down and look natural. Additionaly the pain and discomfort after surgery will increase due to excessive tension. All in all, it will be a better idea to reach your  goal of 34 DD in two stages, set apart by 3 - 6 months. In regard to your EDS, you will have to be assessed and cleared by your EDS specialists due to possible problems with wound healing. Always, consult with board certified plastic surgeons and check their before and after pictures to make sure that you like the results.          
            Best of luck,
                                Dr Widder

Shlomo Widder, MD
Washington DC Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and breast implants?

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The best cosmetic result in any particular breast augmentation patient depends on a variety of factors, including: your individual anatomy, realistic expectations, a thorough discussion with the plastic surgeon about the options, and an understanding of the pros and cons of any particular implant choice. Proper sizing is not just about the number of cc’s. The thickness of your tissue, breast dimensions which include the width, height, and projection, as well as chest wall width all need to be considered when choosing an implant. Trying on implant “sizers” of various shapes and volumes while wearing a tight t-shirt, bra, or bathing sit at a preoperative visit will help you and your surgeon choose the optimal implant.

Everyone heals differently. While I have operated on patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome without complications, it is no guarantee that a patient with this syndrome could not have greater problems with healing.

Keep in mind that following the advice from a surgeon on this or any other website who proposes to tell you what to do without examining you, physically feeling the tissue, assessing your desired outcome, taking a full medical history, and discussing the pros and cons of each operative procedure would not be in your best interest. I would suggest you find a plastic surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and ideally a member of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) that you trust and are comfortable with. You should discuss your concerns with that surgeon in person.

Robert Singer, MD FACS

La Jolla, California

Robert Singer, MD
La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Ehlers-Danlos and breast implants

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During my training at the Mayo Clinic, I was exposed to patients with EDS.  Regarding this condition as with other connective tissue conditions, there are usually a number of different conditions within the syndrome.  This as well as an exam will need to be done.  Connective tissue disorders although not an absolute contraindication for breast implants can be a relative one.  Medical clearance is a must.
 For your height the volume mentioned, in my experience, get you to a DD; however, because of the connective tissue concern, it may be best to decrease the size and weight, since strength of the tissue will be important in holding the implant in place as well as keeping the incision intact.  Take your time and investigate all options thoroughly. 

Peter J. Capizzi, MD
Charlotte Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Large Implant Challenges

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I think it's great that you have a goal size but you have to understand that anything larger than 400 cc comes w greater challenges. It's best to go with an implant that matches your breast diameter. Your surgeon should discuss this with you. 

Justin Yovino, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.