Should I Talk to my Parents About Rhinoplasty?

I'm sixteen years old, and for as long as I can remember, my nose has been terrible. I'm incredibly self-conscious about my nose. Because of it, I've always been relatively shy around people I'm not close with because I feel like they're just staring at my nose and not me. I really want to feel confident and I don't want my nose to stop me from living my life. What should I do?

Doctor Answers (16)

Teenage Rhinoplasty: Everybody is staring at my nose!!

+5

I remember when I was your age, and I thought I was mature and knew everything and that everyone over 30 was soooo old!  Right now your physical body is a pool of raging hormones, and that messes with how your brain works.  Try to get out there and be with your friends, the ones who know the 'real you' and talk about your feelings and try to work out your fears with their help.  Definitely talk to your parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles, anyone that is interested in you and can help you.  Maybe some of them had similar feelings, and they can help you understand what is important and what is not.

 If you think that your feelings are too much for you to handle, and you can't get the help you need from your family, then you might want to ask your parents or your school counsellor for a referral to a therapist.  Body dysmorphic disorder is a problem that I have seen in young people, when some relatively small issue creates a crushing pressure that is hard to handle, sometimes to the point that the person can't leave the house or participate in any activities.  It does not mean you are crazy or anything, it just means that maybe you need some help in getting through this problem.  Believe it or not, recognizing that there is something wrong is the first step in getting better, and having a healthier outlook on your relationships with other people.

  Whether or not there is something 'wrong' with the shape of your nose is not the point here, it is how you are handling it.  Definitely do not jump to wanting to get nose surgery done at your age until you have thoroughly explored your feelings and made sure that you are doing it for all the right reasons.  Who knows, maybe you will learn to love yourself, just like your friends and family love you and accept you just the way you are.

I really hope that you have the support, love,  and understanding of their parents, friends, and family.  In a few years, you will be an adult, and then you can make an informed decision for yourself.  Until then, get out there and enjoy being 16!  There is a huge wonderful world out there for you to enjoy, and unfortunately there is no way of turning back the clock on those wonderful teenage years- when they are gone, they are gone forever.  Try to get involved in a charity, your church, your community,  or any activity that is important to you personally- the environment, sick children, the elderly, the poor- giving to others is great therapy!   You can really help yourself by helping others.   

Claudio DeLorenzi MD FRCS


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Rhinoplasty

+3

A few points:  Your nose is not terrible.  But, all of us have our insecurities.  Even those that we perceive to be very beautiful.  I would venture to say also that your true friends love you for who you are.  Nevertheless, the kind words will not likely change your opinion.  At this age, I would definitely talk with your parents.  They may discourage the procedure.  You can digest their opinion and also visit several plastic surgeons.  You can generally see one for a free consultation.  The more information, the better.  Some unbiased aesthetic information will really benefit you and your parents in your decision.  On brief exam of your photos, you do have what is known as a mild dorsal hump (bump on your nose).  However, your nasolabial angle (the angle the nose makes with the lip) is approximately 100 degrees.  This is nearly the aesthetic ideal.  Thus, aesthetically, your nose has both ideal and less than ideal features.  Before thinking about this further, it would be wise to see a board certified surgeon in your area to evaluate you in person.  The is no other way to assess your nose three dimensionally.  Additionally, nasal function is important.  This is ideally assessed in person.  Good luck.

Jason R. Hess, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Parents and rhinoplasty

+2
If you are self-conscious about the size and shape of your nose, then you should definitely express this to your parents. Many things factor into a decision for surgery: finances, nose v. that car, lack of self esteem, preparedness to undergo a surgical procedure, etc. Definitely confide in them and try to listen to their input. Given that you are under age 18 you cannot undergo a surgical procedure without their consent. You may also want to speak to a counselor about your lack of confidence. 16 is an awful age and many young people have these feelings, regardless of the shape of one part of their anatomy. Definitely, if you're uncomfortable, take the time now to do a little research, find a plastic surgeon with whom you and your parents are comfortable, and perhaps think about that summer or after school job to defray some of the expenses. All the best.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Rhinoplasty - 16 Year Old

+1

First thing you have to do is talk to your parents about your feelings. Then ask them if you can see a Plastic Surgeon for a consultation. If your folks agree then do your homework about doctors specializing in Rhinoplasty in and around your area. Seeing a surgeon allows you to express your specific concerns to someone who can educate you as to what can and cannot be done to improve the appearance of  your nose. You also get a reality check about cost, and risks involved in the procedure. Then it's up to you and your parents to decide if you want to pursue surgery. Overall, Rhinoplasty is a great operation and helps patients to put there nose in better balance with the rest of the face. If you goals are realistic and the surgeon is experienced you have an excellence chance of being very satisfied with the change in your appearance. Best of Luck

Jon F. Harrell, DO
Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Rhinoplasty

+1

Hello,

Having plastic surgery is strictly a personal decision, and you should choose to do whatever makes you the most happy. Please feel free to send any additional, close-up side profile and frontal photos of your nose to my office and I would be happy to provide you with advice. My contact info is listed in my profile. Thank you, and best of luck to you.

Dr. Nassif

Paul S. Nassif, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Speaking To Parents re Rhinoplasty

+1

First of all, whether or not you have a rhinoplasty, your nose should not  "stop me from living my life". With all due respect, you must discuss this with your parents - at 16 years old, you are a minor.  Parental and professional advice will be beneficial.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Yes, talk over Rhinoplasty decision with your parents.

+1

It is common for teens to want to change the appearance of their nose. In my experience, the majority of parents are willing to listen to their teens and support the decision for Rhinoplasty. The earliest age for Rhinoplasty is 15, but parental consent is required. Your photo shows a prominent bump, which should correct nicely with rhinoplasty. Good Luck.  -Dr. G

Edward J. Gross, MD
Orlando Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Talk to your parents about rhinoplasty...I did!

+1

I feel your pain--I was 14 when I had my nose fixed. Mine was just about as bad as yours and I felt deformed. Nothing could be worse for the self-esteem of a teenager than to feel misshapen. I begged my Mom to let me get my nose fixed, and she could see how terrible my self-esteem was, so she encouraged me to call a doctor myself, which I did!

I think the surgeon was a little hesitant to operate on me, because I was so young, but when I told him that "even if you make a mistake, my nose will be better," he knew how deeply bothered I was by my nasal appearance. Having my nose fixed changed my life, made me feel normal, and improved my self-esteem immensely. I get that same thrill now when I operate on patients and help them feel better about themselves.

So, speak to your parents about it and best of luck!

Theda C. Kontis, MD
Baltimore Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Speaking to Parents regarding Teenage Rhinoplasty

+1

Nottingham in Nottingham, MD,

It's very important to have this plastic surgery discussion with your family. Outside of financial support and providing informed consent for surgery, one should have the emotional support of loved ones following rhinoplasty surgery. From a surgical standpoint, rhinoplasty for teenagers is typically considered around 16 for girls and 17 for boys. 

Rhinoplasty is common plastic surgery procedure for teenage boys and girls. The nose is relatively larger than the rest of the face during this time. Large noses may be due to a bump at the bridge, wide nasal tip, or droopy tip. Due to this facial imbalance or asymmetry, many teenagers pressure their parents for cosmetic surgery. Body parts that might appear too large or too small now can become more proportionate over time.

The nose continues to grow as we age, but the largest rate of nasal growth occurs during teen years. Generally, this rate slows greatly at age 16 for most girls, and 17 for most boys. As a result, most plastic surgeons wait until this age before considering rhinoplasty for teenagers.

Only after a comprehensive evaluation by a rhinoplasty surgeon can he/she help make appropriate recommendations for you. Best of luck.

Dr. Chaboki

Houtan Chaboki, MD
Washington DC Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.