Synthetic Hair Implants for Female Hair Loss?

I would like to restore my hair's thickness again and I am considering synthetic hair implants procedure. I am 23 and female. I know it may be medical reason to my hair loss but also I want instant results without using extensions to damage my hair. Am I a candidate for synthetic hair implants? And roughly, what are the costs?

Doctor Answers (8)

Synthetic hair implants

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Synthetic hair fibers that are transplanted into the scalp were banned by the FDA in 1983. They are still available in parts of the world - and companies in Japan and Italy manufacture various types. 

The fibers were banned by the FDA for many reasons including high risks of infection, scarring, cyst formation, poor long term outcome and concerns over long terms risks (including cancer). 







Toronto Dermatologist

Re: Synthetic hair

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Synthetic hair implants are not FDA approved. They entail high risks of infection and other complications since they are a foreign substance that is likely to be rejected by your body.

Synthetic hair fibers are obviously not able to grow. So if they should ever break off, not much can be done to replace these hairs.


Most patients who have had these implants have not had very good long term experiences.

Sanusi Umar, MD
Redondo Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Synthetic Hair Implants for Female Hair Loss

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Synthetic hair implants have been tried and have uniformly been failures.  The most common problem is infection and I am unaware of any currently available of any synthetic implants. 

Jack Fisher, MD
Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Synthetic hair implants, not reccommended

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I have seen numerous patients with synthetic hair fibers. My experience has not been good. The fibers are not FDA approved. These artificial fibers are synthetic polymers that become brittle and tend to break off at the skin level; Further, 15-20% of the fibers are pushed out of the scalp every year.  Infections may also develop at the site of the implants, requiring removal of the foreign material. Hair dryers causes the fibers to frizz and damages the fibers at the skin level. So, I would stick to regular hair transplant. They are more natural.

Dr Behnam

Ben Behnam, MD
Santa Monica Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Synthetic Hair Implants

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I would unequivocally recommend that you do not use synthetic hair implants. After treating many problems, including infection and rejection, my partner, Dr. Toby Mayer, and I testified before our state government which passed legislation making the the placement of these synthetic fibers illegal in the State of California.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Synthetic hair implants cause infection.

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 30 years ago my partner and I treated 50-100 patients with infection of the scalp secondary to synthetic implants. Not only that but the fibers usually break after time. 

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Say no to synthetic hair implants

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These will destroy the surrounding native hairs in the long run. If there is an area of total baldness there may be a lesser risk. But unless this process is religiously periodically monitored  chronic infection is likely to result.

Sheldon S. Kabaker, MD
Oakland Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Don't get synthetic hair implants

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The last patient that I saw with synthetic hair implants from another country, had 100 cm squared of scalp loss. We placed a balloon expander for 3 months and were able to advance the normal hair 10 cm to cover the defect. The hair needed to be drilled from the skull as it had worked its way into the outer table of bone. As far as I know, these implants are not legal in the USA.

Kevin Ende, MD
Manhattan Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.