Does Symmastia Get Worse over Time? or During/after Pregnancy?

I got breast implants 5 years ago and I have very small symmastia, I am planning to have a baby maybe in one or two years but I would like to know if the pregnancy will affect more my implant breast problem. Should I change my implants to a smaller size and get a surgery correction for the symmastia before I get pregnant? does symmastia get worse over time?

Doctor Answers (15)

Symmastia and pregnancy

+3

Your condition of symmastia shouldn't really change from pregnancy.  Your breast implants are sitting too centrally in that condition and pregnancy should not alter this.  Your tissues may change though and so I would wait until you are done having kids to do a correction.  Remember that when correcting implant pocket problems, going bigger at the same time is usually the wrong thing to do.


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Symmastia Correction Timing

+2

Symmastia might get worse with time.  Are your implants placed above or below the muscle.  If the implants were placed above the muscle then converting them to a submuscular position might improve them.  Acellular dermal grafts might be needed if the symmastia worsens.  This is a difficult problem to correct.  Before or after pregnancy?  There is not an ideal time to do the surgery.  Given your options, it is better to do this before the problem worsens further.

Elizabeth S. Harris, MD
San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Symmastia

+2

Implants that are malpositioned could certainly make the condition worse, but more often than not, overtime the implants tend to migrate laterally and inferiorly more than medially.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

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Breast implants, breast augmentation, synmastia

+2
Malpositioned implants can shift further over time. The problem with synmastia is that the frequently is not muscle attatchment medially and this allows the implant to move in that direction. Increased breast size with pregnancy could make this problem appear worse.

David L. Abramson, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
3.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Pregnancy and synmastia

+2

You say that you have a "very small" synmastia.  To me this means that your two breast pockets are separate, but the tissue between them is tented a bit.  In over 20 years and thousands of breast augmentations I have never seen a stable breast pocket get larger or merge with another during pregnancy.  Your breasts may get larger and touch more though making the problem look worse while your breasts are swollen.  Synmastia correction is best accomplished with the use of acellular dermal matrices and smaller implants.  It is not an easy or inexpensive procedure.  No one can predict what your breasts will do during pregnancy. Often women want their breasts lifted if there is volume loss or laxity afterwards.  This being a possibility I would consider waiting until you have your children to get what needs to be done all at once.

Lori H. Saltz, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Symmastia and pregnancy

+2

There is nothing to suggest that symmastia will get worse with pregnancy if your breast has been stable over five years. Over a life time as the breast ages there can be more fatty infiltration within the breast tissue and the breast can become more 'matronly' with more cleavage and perhaps more of a symmastia appearance. Reduce the size of implants if the look is your goal, and don't' let a future family be the deciding factor.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Symmastia and breast implants

+2

It is impossible to answer your question because it is like trying to predict the future. If you have had stable symmastia for 5 years it is unlikely to get worse. That does not mean it will not. If you add pregnancy to the mix it depends on how much your breasts engorge whether or not you breast feed etc. but is still not predictable with 100% accuracy. It does not sound like it is very severe since you waited this long to fix it but you did not post a photo. What you consider small symmastia may be considered insignificant by a plastic surgeon. Barring any other problems your best bet is to wait until after you have delivered your baby and the breasts have stopped producing milk in order to get the longest life span out of your next surgery.

When I hear a woman say I am going to have a baby in a couple of years it is usually more wishful thinking than planned parenthood. If that is the case and the symmastia bothers you earlier surgery with placement of a smaller implant and possible use of acellular dermal matrix is warranted.

My response to your question/post does not represent formal medical advice or constitute a doctor patient relationship. You need to consult with i.e. personally see a board certified plastic surgeon in order to receive a formal evaluation and develop a doctor patient relationship.

Aaron Stone, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon

Symmastia and pregnancy

+2

Symmastia may worsen over time, and the effects of pregnancy on breast size / shape cannot be predicted in advance.  If you have noted worsening of your symmastia over time, you may wish to have it corrected now, because once you become pregnant you will need to wait until after you have had the baby and stopped producing milk.  If your "very small" symmastia has been stable, you may want to wait until after any future pregnancies, to see if other breast changes occur that you may want to address at the same time as the symmastia repair.  You would benefit from an in person consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who could examine you and discuss your options in detail.

Good luck.

My response to your question/post does not represent formal medical advice or constitute a doctor patient relationship. You need to consult with i.e. personally see a board-certified plastic surgeon in order to receive a formal evaluation and develop a doctor patient relationship.

Craig S. Rock, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Symmastia (Uniboob) Gets Worse with Time

+2

Re; "Does Symmastia Get Worse over Time? or During/after Pregnancy?"

Symmastia is caused by a combination of using large breast implants and creating large inner pockets for them, thereby nearly obliterating or removing the natural bridge barrier between the breasts. The only solution is their replacement with smaller breast implants and reconstruction in which the inner connection is obliterated - now commonly done with a biological sheets such as Alloderm or Strattice.

While pregnancy will not necessarily worsen symmastia - (ie enlarge the connection), time is NOT on your side. Frankly, only a few red wines truly get better with age - people do not improve with age. They sag and their tissues thin. In the case of an opening it will tend to get larger unless you constantly wear a special strap which keeps the breast implants apart.

I would go ahead and complete your family first. Then, after you are done breast feeding, if you are still bothered by their appearance and the breasts are not changing in size, only then would I recommend considering a symmastia correction.

Good Luck.

Dr. Peter A Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

Does Symmastia Get Worse over Time? or During/after Pregnancy?

+2

Very hard question to advise. There is no prefect answer. I believe the risk is very small to have worsening of the symmastia with a pregnancy, but there are always exceptions. If you are basing your future pregnancy upon the symmastia - DON'T. The choice of trying to correct prior to pregnancy or later is purely yours. Personally I would wait. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.