Symastia? I had 300CC, saline, under the muscle done approx 8 weeks ago. (photo)

The implants are close (one finger width apart laying down). When I wear a bra I have some lifting of the skin in the middle. I am concerned about symastia, any thoughts? Anything I can do to help avoid symastia? My doctor plans to keep an eye on me and will see me back in 6 weeks.

Doctor Answers (11)

Breast implants too close

+2

While this is not technically a synmastia, I would argue that your implant pockets have been dissected too close to the midline. Your implants are not centered behind your nipples and areolae and are now too close to each other in the midline. I would suggest undergoing a capsulorrhaphy procedure if you are unhappy with the look of your result. 


Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Symmastia?

+2

The breasts are definitely close together.  Normally if implants are under the muscle, they are not that close.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

You do not apper to have symmastia

+2

Your implants and breasts appear close together, which is a combination of the width of the implant, the size of the pocket and your natural anatomy.  A narrower and smaller implant would help to widen the space between the breasts.

Michael S. Hopkins, MD
Albuquerque Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 42 reviews

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Symmastia

+1
Thank you for you question. 
Symmastia is when the muscle is released aggressively from the sternum resulting in a common pocket. With that said, your implants are very close, but they appear to be separated. This might improve, a little, over time as the skin relaxes but not much. If you don't like the look now, I would suggest a revision with a smaller implant and pocket modification. 
I hope this helps

Matthew Becker, MD
Knoxville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Breast Enhancement

+1
Looks like you have relatively large implants for your size and they are stretching the muscle I seriously doubt that the muscle has been dissected off of the sternum. I think you will be fine!

Ryan Neinstein, MD, FRCSC
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Not symmastia

+1

This is not symmastia and the pockets look like they were dissected quite well for the implant size you have and your nipple/areolar position.

The best way to increase your cleavage would be to go with a smaller implant that doesn't span the width of your chest quite as much.

Robert S. Backstein, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Symmastia is confluence of two breasts across midline. It happens when right and left pockets communicate

+1

Based on your photos you are fine and don't have symmastia. Stop worrying. No special treatment is needed

 

Vasdev Rai, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Symmastia

+1

Thanks for your question and picture.  If your implants are under the muscle as you mentioned you should not be develop symmastia unless the muscle was aggressively divided off of the sternum.  Only your surgeon would know this.  Several garment makers including Marena, make breast stabilizing bras.  Please ask you plastic surgeon if he/she would reccomend one of these devices to address your concern.

Vishnu Rumalla, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

Synmastia?

+1

This is not synmastia. Your implants are close together. Since you didn't include a preoperative picture, I can't comment on how close together your breast were before surgery. Many times in breast that sit close together, the tissue will elevate when the breast are pushed together, but this will usually resolve after 4 to 6 months after the tissue has relaxed. If not, then you could consider a smaller diameter implant.

Donald Griffin, MD
Nashville Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Symastia?

+1

This is not symmastia, a condition so defined when the implants are touching each other. These are clearly separated. By eight weeks the capsules have formed around the implants making it unlikely that these will develop into symmastia.

If you do not like the current appearance, you may wish to think about smaller implants. All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.