Swollen Lip/columella Normal 5 Weeks After Rhinoplasty?

I am currently 5 weeks post op on an OPEN primary rhinoplasty. I cannot purse my lips together as if to apply lipstick 'cos the upper lip is very tight. I also feel like my upper lip (where columella meets lip) looks swollen. Is this possible and normal? When should I expect this to resolve itself?

Doctor Answers (5)

Swollen Lip/Columella after Rhinoplasty

+1

You have more swelling than normal 5 weeks after the rhinoplasty, but this always resolves. Share your concern with your surgeon.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Swollen upper lip after rhinoplasty

+1

Numbness, swelling, difficulty smiling or pursing the lips early after a rhinoplasty are all very common. This all gets better with time.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Swollen lip/columella normal 5 weeks after rhinoplasty

+1

Very common after "open" rhinoplasty where the columella is cut through and through. This is due to lymphatic drainage disruption. And can last several months. Discuss with your rhinoplasty surgeon.

From MIAMI Dr. B

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

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Bulging graft can cause fullness of upper lip after rhinoplasty.

+1

Hi.

Most likely, you just have more swelling than normal after rhinoplasty, and you will be fine.  But do see your plastic surgeon in case there is an anatomical problem.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
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Swelling of lips after rhinoplasty.

+1

This is normal and can take several months for the last bit to go away. It always does, so relax and don't worry.

Toby Mayer, MD
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.