Can I Swim in a Public Pool or Go into a Hot Tub After Mohs Surgery? (photo)

The mohs site (about a quarter sized on my right ankle for melanoma) was not closed and it has been two weeks since the surgery. I know pools can be full of bacteria, and would rather be on the safe side. Mu doctor said I have no restrictions, but I'm having trouble walking and would like some exercise.

Doctor Answers (4)

Taking care of a skin cancer incision after surgery - Los Angeles

+1

Swimming in a pool or hot tub is not recommended unless the wound is epithelialized, or else you risk infection of the wound. Raffy Karamanoukian, Los Angeles


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Can I Swim in a Public Pool or Go into a Hot Tub After Mohs Surgery? (photo)

+1

Hello,

i would wait 2 weeks to ensure the wound has sealed with a crust or fully healed. Extremities are more prone to infection.

 

Peter Malouf, DO
Dallas Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 70 reviews

Mohs surgery wound care

+1

You are healing by mother nature also known as second intention. The skin will fill in bottom up and from the sides. It will take several weeks. During this time, most Mohs surgeons like myself, recommend that you avoid swimming pools or lakes. If walking is an issue, then perhaps there are other ways to get exercise such as biking or weight lifting.

Omar Ibrahimi, MD
Stamford Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

You might also like...

Using public pool or hot tub after Mohs surgery

+1

In reality, I wouldn't recommend a public pool or hot tub for awhile. Until you have new, pink skin covering the area, it's just not a good idea. Biking or walking would be fine, so choose exercise that won't put your skin in harm.

F. Victor Rueckl, MD
Las Vegas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.