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Swelling in Tip of Nose Even Though Only the Bones Were Worked On, Is This Normal?

Hi there, I had Rhinoplasty on the bones within my nose to narrow them from front view and promote an S shape from side view,however, my tip was also very swollen after the op. I had the op ten months ago in Prague, I am from the UK. The tip is still swollen and i believe that the sides of my nose may also be swollen but am not sure the bone still appears quite wide. The skin here feels slightly soft and springy, could this be swelling, is the skin still contracting over my nose to shrink

Doctor Answers (5)

Tip Swelling 10 Months Post Rhinoplasty

+1

If an open rhinoplasty was performed, temporary tip swelling is possible. However, at 10 months most of this should have resolved. Although inconvenient, you should consult with your surgeon because you're also questioning the results in the bony portion of your nose.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Is THIS the Final Appearance of the Nose?

+1

At ten months you are looking at the nearly complete final appearance of your nose. Moreover, when the nose bones are in-fractured to narrow the nose especially when combined with lowering a nasal hump, the nose skin has to be somewhat peeled off the nose to allow this profile smoothing.

Prague is a beautiful city and I understand my colleagues there are cheaperthan my British colleagues (especially the Harley Street crowd) may be but you now have the classic dilemma of Surgical Tourism; You have a condition which your surgeon should answer and yet, yours is quite a ways away.

If you cannot see your surgeon, you may want to bite your lip and pay a good local nose surgeon to see you in face to face consultation to best advise you.

Peter A Aldea, MD
Memphis, TN

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Swelling in Tip of Nose Even Though Only the Bones Were Worked On, Is This Normal?

+1

  Things should be close to the final result at 10 months post open Rhinoplasty.  You should ask your Rhinoplasty Surgeon these questions.  An open Rhinoplasty dissects all the tissues, off of the nose, including over the nasal tip so even though the tip cartilages may not have been manipulated, during the Rhinoplasty, post surgical swelling and scar formation can still form in the tip making it wider.   Photos would help with the evaluation.  Wide nasal bones may indicate an incomplete closure or meeting of the nasal bones after the bridge was reduced.  IMHO, the most important factor in selecting a Rhinoplasty Surgeon is their ability to understand and follow the proper aesthetics of facial (and nasal) beauty for the creation of a naturally, more attractive nose.  

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Swelling ten months after rhinoplasty

+1

With an open technique there will indeed be swelling and stiffness in the tip even if the plan did not include tip changes. If the nasal bones are still wide as well then it isn't clear just what was done. Swelling is substantially reduced by ten months and you should see what you got from it all. Hope things didn't get lost in translation.

Best of luck, peterejohnsonmd.com

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Swelling after rhinoplasty

+1

Scorpsal,

Thank you for your question. You don't mention unevenness or asymmetry, just tip swelling and "sponginess."From this I assume you are indeed still experiencing swelling. Sometimes there will be post-operative swelling for a year, and the tip often will stay swollen longer than the rest of the nose. It would be advisable to see your surgeon sometime within the next couple of months for a thorough post-surgical nasal exam just to be certain there are no problems.

William H. Gorman, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.