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Will Surgery for Deviated Septum Remove the Crooked Cartilage in my Nostril, Straighten Nose, and Remove a Large Bump? (photo)

From age 15 to 19 I had a terrible habit of cracking my nose. Once I realized how bad my nose was looking, along with the pain and breathing problems, I stopped. I am now 29 years old, have great health insurance, and want to finally get it fixed. I had an examination and was told straightening my septum will help me breath better. So my question is this... Will this surgury also straighten my whole nose and remove this large, long bump on the upper left side of my nose under my eye?

Doctor Answers (7)

Improvement with Correction of Deviated Septum

+1

Correcting a deviated septum will improve your breathing and straighten your nose but it will not reduce your hump or narrow your nose. Insurance typically pays for functional improvement but the patient is usually responsible for cosmetic changes


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Will Surgery for Deviated Septum Remove the Crooked Cartilage in my Nostril, Straighten Nose, and Remove a Large Bump?

+1

         The functional septoplasty in general does little to address cosmetic issues and will certainly not address the hump.  Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of rhinoplasties and rhinoplasty revisions each year.  Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.


Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 193 reviews

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Septoplasty versus Rhinoplasty

+1

A septoplasty alone will not straighten your nose externally nor will it remove a hump of your nasal bridge.  A rhinoplasty will be required to accomplish both of those objectives.  Sometimes a functional rhinoplasty is performed to aid in breathing if there are issues with either the internal or external nasal valves.  A functional rhinoplasty can result in some straightening of the nose depending upon the technique that is used and is usually covered by insurance (but not always); however, there would have to be a clear indication of a nasal valve problem for your surgeon to recommend that to you.  Good luck.

A. Joshua Zimm, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Will Surgery for Deviated Septum Remove the Crooked Cartilage in my Nostril, Straighten Nose, and Remove a Large Bump?

+1

Great question to ask the surgeon who will be doing your operation. My response is a yes, but you need to her explained all the procedures involved.//

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Septoplasty versus rhinoplasty

+1

 A septoplasty and rhinoplasty are 2 completely separate operations, which can be done separately or together. The septoplasty procedure  is performed for medical necessity when  the septum is deviated in such a fashion that is obstructing air flow dynamics through the nose. A septoplasty is billed to the patient's insurance. The surgery is performed in the back of the nose. A rhinoplasty procedure involves work on the tip, the bridge and the external portion of the nose all done through the nostrils known as closed rhinoplasty. A rhinoplasty will change the shape of the nose but will not improve air flow. A rhinoplasty must be paid for by the patient themselves.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Nasal surgery

+1

Septal surgery will only address the internal nose to improve breathing and is usually covered by insurance.  Rhinoplasty is done to remove the hump and straighten the external nose to which will improve it cosmetically.  Insurance does not cover cosmetic surgery.  Septoplasty and rhinoplasty are often done at the same time.  Donald R. Nunn MD  Atlanta Plastic Surgeon.

Donald Nunn, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.