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Surgery Needed to Correct Breast Implant Placement?

Should I have another surgery to correct the placement of my breast implants? I had a Breast augmentation 3 years ago and they never quite settled down to where the scar is. They are heavier on the top as well, especially on the right side. I think they should be fuller on the bottom. I have read about open Capsulotomy, and I think maybe that's something I should consider. My breast always look too high in clothes, and dont slope like natural breast do. I've attached a photo where you can see the scars are about a half inch below the crease, the distance increases when I raise my arms. Thanks for your help!

Doctor Answers (5)

Implant size and breast tissue

+1

Thanks for your question -

I think that there may be several issues here. The first may be that you might see improvement by lowering the position of the implants. But you may have issues of breast ptosis (sagging). From the image it appears that the breast tissue is hanging from the implant which can be a classic problem of the breast being too saggy for an augmentation.

Admittedly it is difficult to determine this from the single image you've shown. But when you speak with your doctor be sure to think about whether maybe the implants are in the correct place but the breast tissue requires a lift.

I hope this helps.


San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Lowering is an option

+1

As has been mentioned, it is difficult to give real advice without examining you as well as a photo taken at a point level with your nipples. Your scars are lower but measurements need to be taken to see what the appropriate course of action is. Your best bet would be to make an appointment with a board-certified plastic surgeon or better yet the plastic surgeon who performed your initial surgery.

Dr Edwards

Michael C. Edwards, MD, FACS
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Can lower the implants with an inferior capsulotomy or capsulectomy

+1

The ideal position of a breast implant is to have the center of the implant directly behind the center of the breast. The decision of where to make the crease or inframammary incision is based upon the base diameter of the implant to be inserted. It is possible that you originally had a tight or high crease and once the capsule formed around the implant it became displaced to a higher position. To correct this condition, especially if the implant is high with excessive upper pole fullness, an inferior capsulotomy can be performed. This consists of either making slits in the capsule or removing the lower capsule and pushing the implant down to a better position.

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

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Conflict of interest

+1

What you want is probably conflicting with the relative size of your implants. Augmentation is in imperfect operation. The more your final breast is comprised of implant, the more imperfect they might be as far a placement, form, shape, naturalness, etc. I have a feeling you might always be fighting with some issue because the implants are relatively too large for your natural breast.

Robin T.W. Yuan, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Please submit a front view

+1

Hello

I can see that the scars are lower than the lower portion of the implant, but it is hard to make a recommendation without a front view. That would be most helpful. It does sound like you need to have the implants lowered, if they always look too high in clothes. Lowering an implant can be done successfully, even at 3 years after surgery. I would advise you to consult with a board-certified plastic surgeon and they would be able to give you more options after an examination. Best of luck.

Francisco Canales, MD
Santa Rosa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.