How Do You Prevent a Woman's Natural Breast Tissue from Falling to the Sides, Away from the Implant, when She Lays Down? (photo)

In both of my prior BA's (unders-saline/silicone), my breast tissue fell to the sides when I lay on my back. I am about to get much smaller form stable implants (gummies-Natrelle 410) & a keyhole lift. Currently I have significant breast tissue on the top of my breasts that falls to the sides, although the bottom of my breasts has very little tissue, due to overly large implants. Will the lift be enough to stop my natural breast tissue from falling away from the implants when I am on my back?

Doctor Answers (6)

You will likely need internal sutures as welll as a lift to get the look you want

+2

Internal sutures or capsulorraphy sutures can elevate your breast pocket and the left will place your breast tissue over the elevated pocket.  Your best bet is to ask your surgeon for photos of similar cases he has done and see if the results he obtained are likely to make you happy.  This is not an easy surgery and you want to be comfortable that your surgeon can achiev the results you desire.


Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Tissue Movement = Breast Lift

+2
The lateral displacement of breat tissue over your implant when you lay flat suggests that you have too much skin laxity causing your breast tissue to fall to the side over the implant.  Your photos also suggest that your implants are too large for your fram and worsening the problems by stretching the skin envelope and incision lines.  Replacing your current implants with smaller ones and combining with a lift is a good idea.  Only physical examination can determine if a "keyhole" lift will be enough to prevent this problem from occuring postop.  Good luck!

George Bitar, MD
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Lift and Possible Pocket Revision

+1

   The breast lift and the closing down of the lateral pocket may produce the most reliable result.  The breast lift by itself may be enough as some of the displacement will occur if you have more breast tissue to begin.  Kenneth Hughes, MD HughesPlasticSurgery Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

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True Breast Lift

+1

It is not uncommon for the lower poles of the breast to get overly stretched out from breast implants that are too large. I do a fair amount of revision breast surgery, so I have seen this problem many times before. Commonly, what is needed is down-sizing of the implant, along with a full breast lift in order to put the breast tissue back into balance.

Kevin Brenner, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Fallinf to sides

+1

This is caused by large implants and relative laxity of the tissues. The only option is much smaller implants with internal structural reconstruction and capsulorraphy.

Norman Bakshandeh, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Natural Breast Tissue Falling Laterally Away From Implants

+1

Hello.

Thank you for sharing your photos.

Unfortunately, without a physical consultation it is difficult to provide you with definitive answer to your main concern.

Nonetheless, the laxity of your skin at this point may not at its best. Also, the large size of your implants contribute to the lateral drooping you are experiencing when you "lay on your back".

A good combination will be a a Lollipop lift with smaller implants. Also a capsulorrhaphy (internally suturing the capsule) may be required.

That being said, please remember that commendable results require an exceptionally skilled surgeon to perform the surgery and settling for anything less than that increases the chances of additional corrective surgeries dramatically.


I hope this helps and please feel free to check the website below.

Thank you for your inquiry.
The best of luck to you.

Dr. Sajjadian

Ali Sajjadian, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 108 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.