Supratip Break?

Is it possible to have a straight profile with a slight supratip break? Or is "supratip break" another way of asking for slope? I thought about doing just a straight profile but upon research, thought a slight supratip break would make my nose look less long from the profile view. Am I thinking about the supratip break correctly? Does anyone have any pics of a straight profile with a slight supratip break? I just want to make sure I am understanding this term and the results. Thank you.

Doctor Answers (6)

Supratip Break In Rhinoplasty

+1

It is often aesthetic to have a slight supratip break especially in females, but that is up for discussion with the patient in conjunction with an experienced rhinoplasty surgeon. Often, I do not make a significant supratip break, in a male rhinoplasty patient.


Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

I call it a supra-tip dip. It accents a delicate tip.

+1

It's one of the nuances to rhinoplasty.  Leaving a hint of a supra tip dip to accent the feminine tip.  I avoid it like the plague on men.  But on women, a perfectly straight profile can look a little to strong, unless the face is long and the patient is tall.  Supra tip dips are easy to fill afterwards, if you don't like yours so it's no harm-no foul going for a nice supra tip dip with your rhinoplasty.

Ritu Chopra, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Supratip "Break" makes the nasal profile more natural.

+1

An absolutely straight nasal profile is often felt by patients (and doctors) to be an unnatural "operated-on" look. The slight upward tilt of the nasal tip from an otherwise straight nasal profile is created surgically where one is not present to give a more natural, un-operated tip appearance. Some men are OK with a straight nasal profile, but most women (and some men) prefer a more refined, elegant look with a slight "break" in the straight line. The ideal "break" is very subtle, IMHO.

A "scoop" or curve to the nasal profile is generally a sign of over-resection of the nasal hump, and can give an unnatural "ski jump"  type nasal appearance. This is not a good look, and the tiny overdone nose went "out" in the 60's!

Richard H. Tholen, MD, FACS
Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 144 reviews

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Supratip break

+1

It sounds like you have the right idea about the STB point.  It will make your nose look a bit more feminine in addition to the concepts that you've understood.  In order to create it we need to surgically raise the tip of the nose over the dorsum, so it is quite a different concept in answer to your question about a slope nose.  Good luck.

Ricardo A. Meade, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Nose surgery with a supratip break

+1

The supra-tip break in rhinoplasty refers to a slight projection of the tip above the bridge on profile. The bridge will be straight or neutral, slightly curved, or even have a small hump remaining and still allow a supra-tip break. The slight projection of the tip above is considered the aesthetic 'standard' when judging a good result, but the look can appeal to some and not others as there is no 'right' result in nose surgery, only one that suits your features and goals.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Rhinoplasty and supratip break

+1

The supratip break is a 1 or 2 mm deep concave area just above the tip of the nose that is mostly visible on a side view. In the absence of this break we say there is a supratip deformity. The reason for trying to place it there is to make the result of surgery more natural in appearance so the nose does not look operated on. This is very different from a ski slope deformity in terms of depth and length of the concave area on the bridge. The treatment of ski slopes is to place a graft on the bridge of the nose.

Aaron Stone, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.