Sun Exposure After Rhinoplasty - Wearing sunblock doesn't bother me but I am not one to wear hats!

I am about 3 wks post-op from a closed Rhino and I am recovering fine. I wear a big hat and 100 SPFSunblock while I am outside. In afew wks,would it be permissable to wear just sunblock when I hang outside with friends or walk my dog? Wearing sunblock doesn't bother me but I am not one to wear hats!

Doctor Answers (11)

Sun protection after rhinoplasty

+1

It is certainly acceptable to use just sunblock to protect your nose a month after rhinoplasty. You do not necessarily need a hat as long as you have good sunblock on the nose.  


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Sun Block is ALWAYS a good idea

+1

All operated upon skin is very sensitive to ultraviolet, including sun light, radiation. Wearing a sunblock will safeguard the skin and enhance your surgical results.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Sun Exposure after Rhinoplasty

+1

It is smart  to always wear sun block  to avoid skin damage and the development of skin cancers. Your skin will be more sensitive to sun exposure for about 6 weeks after nasal surgery.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Rhinoplasty and Sun Protection

+1

Hi,

After rhinoplasty it is advised to avoid sun burn as it causes more swelling to the freshly operated upon nose.  Sun block, a good hat, and sun exposure avoidance is recommended.  If you are outside for limited time with friends or walking your dog, you should be fine with a sun block with SPF greater than 30, with or without a hat.  Discuss this with your rhinoplasty surgeon.

Enjoy your new nose.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Rhinoplasty and sunblock

+1

Sunblock is always a good thing to wear when out in the sun.  It does not specifically help or hurt your rhinoplasty in anyway especially if you do not have an external incision from an open rhinoplasty.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Sunning after rhinoplasty.

+1

Use of a sunblock is something that should be part of your daily routine. Hats give you more protection and prevent more swelling of the nose and wrinkles in the future.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Sun exposure after rhinoplasty

+1

This is more a question for your surgeon. each of us have our own post operatives protocols. I recommend NO SUN for 6 weeks, no sun screen, no exposure of any type IF POSSIBLE. But that is just my protocols.

From MIAMI DR. B

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Sun exposure after nose surgery.

+1

You should be careful about sun exposure after any surgery. This can cause burns or hyperpigmentation. Certain skin types may be more prone. Other factors include the amount of exposure and time of day. Exercise caution.  

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Sun exposure after rhinoplasty

+1

This soon after rhinoplasty the big concern would be to increase swelling.  It is summer so the heat is on.

Protect your investment until cleared by your doctor.

Scott E. Kasden, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Sun exposure after rhinoplasty

+1

Since it was a closed rhino, there should be no external incisions. If there aren't, then a good sunscreen should be all that's required. Check with your surgeon, as always, though. 

BTW, a good sunscreen is always advisable whether or not one has had surgery. It ages the face, and causes wrinkles and skin cancers among other things.

All the best,

--DCP

David C. Pearson, MD
Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.