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Is Sun Exposure Okay 5 Weeks After Fraxel Laser Treatment?

I got fraxel laser treatment against wrinkles (don't know the name of the laser) and can only say that after day 6 brown skin is finally flaking off). The result so far is zero, the fine lines that were there before are present the same way. My question now is, if I go 5 weeks later on vacation can I expose myself (of course with sun screen lotion) to the sun. I am a mediterranean type and tan very fast. Thank you very much for your answer. Vicky

Doctor Answers (2)

Sun Exposure 5 Weeks After Fraxel Laser Treatment

+1

According to Fraxel.com, it is actually best to avoid direct sun exposure three months after your treatment. However you can still take precautions by wearing a wide brimmed hat and using sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher. Try to be as conservative as you possibly can in exposing yourself to the sun on your vacation. But most importantly, follow any suggestions and recommendations that your dermatologist provides.

Web reference: http://www.finetouchdermatology.com/los-angeles-wrinkles-and-sun-damage/

Redondo Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Sun exposure can cause brown spots

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Sun exposure after Fraxel laser should be ok with the following precautions - wear a wide brim hat always, use broad sprectrum sun block preferably one with zinc and try to seek shade when you outdoors. Also a topical antioxidant serum such as Skin ceuticals vitamin c or Phloretin can help prevent sun damage. Sun exposure can cause changes in the skin that lead to brown discoloration and collagen and elastin loss that increases fine lines that you are trying to treat with the fraxel. Protect your investment - but enjoy your vacation - both are possible!

Charlotte Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.