Sudden Droopiness in Face - What are My Surgical Options?

About a couple months ago I had this sudden facial weakness and droopiness in the left side of my face.Involving the zone within the eye and the cheek, I feel its very hollow, also i feel my left is slanted .I Have been researching procedures that can help me but cant seem to understand which one i need. Also cause of my sudden droopiness my cheeks and midface have thinned out a lot. What is recommended for this case? and will insurence cover anything of the cost do to the facial weakness?

Doctor Answers (4)

Sudden Sagging of half the Face - Do I need Surgery?

+2

Regarding: "Sudden Droopiness in Face - What are My Surgical Options?
About a couple months ago I had this sudden facial weakness and droopiness in the left side of my face.Involving the zone within the eye and the cheek
, I feel its very hollow, also i feel my left is slanted .I Have been researching procedures that can help me but cant seem to understand which one i need. Also cause of my sudden droopiness my cheeks and midface have thinned out a lot. What is recommended for this case? and will insurence cover anything of the cost do to the facial weakness
?"

Asymmetric facial weakness and sagging are a classic presentation of Facial Nerve paralysis, termed Bell's Palsy (after the Scot physician Charles Bell who described it). It classically comes on suddenly and in most, but not all cases, resolves completely with near-normal to normal facial muscle functions.

You need to be seen by a good neurologist above all you must make sure the eye closes when you sleep and if you are not sure, it needs to be taped to avoid a corneal abrasion or ulceration.

There are a variety of reconstructive operations but they depend on WHICH part of the face is paralyzed and the extent of paralysis. I think this discussion is premature and you may recover without needing ANY surgery.

Good Luck.

Dr. Peter Aldea


Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Personal consultation is needed--but not necessarily with a plastic surgeon

+2

It sounds like you may have Bell's Palsy, which is a neurological condition that causes temporary facial muscle weakness. You may need to be evaluated by a neurologist.

This is a great example of the need for personal consultations--of course you can't figure out what you need from online research if you don't know ALL the possible reasons for your condition.  Please see a physician.

Carmen Kavali, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Sudden weakness of face: Surgery is not usually indicated

+1

Surgery is not the solution to your problem at this point in time unless the cause is due to a vascular anomaly or tumor which should be resected. In all likelihood this is the consequence of a viral infection.  In the early stages antiviral therapy and high dose steroids may have been indicated but that time is long past due. I would see a neurologist to evaluate all potential treatable causes. However, therapy is most likely palliative with therapy possibly indicated. Electrical stimulation is controversial. Protection of the eye against corneal abrasion is of paramount importance. In most instances the condition is managed with observation.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

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Droopy face

+1

Sudden asymmetric changes to you face need to be evaluated by a medical doctor.  I would recommend seeing a neurologist to make sure that you are not having a neurological disorder such as Bell's Palsy.  If this is the case, then you likely will not need any plastic surgery immediately as your function may return to normal.  If after your evaluation and with time you still have asymmetry there are several procedures which would be performed both surgically and non-invasively but these can be addressed after the primary issue is resolved.  Good luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.