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Will Stretch Marks Change the Outcome of a Breast Lift?

My breasts grew very rapidly aroun the age of 12. Since then I have had stretch marks around my entire breast. I am interested in getting a breast lift, but I don't want to spend the money and still have sagging breasts because of my damaged skin. I am only 23 and have not had children yet.

Doctor Answers (11)

Will stretch marks change a breast lift?

+2

Unfortunately, stretch marks usually will alter the long term results of a breast lift.  A breast lift involves removing and tightening skin to lift the breast.  Another important aspect of this procedure is anchoring or supporting the breast tissue mound to improve long term longevity.  The type of procedure done, (ie. inverted "T" vs. short scar or vertical breast lift) will also affect how well the result holds up.  This does not mean that you are not a candidate for the procedure, but depending on your anatomy, most patients with stretch marks and damaged skin will eventually need re-lifted. We can slow down the effects of gravity but not stop it all together.  Good luck!


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Breast Lifting and Stretch Marks?

+1

Yes, unfortunately, the presence of stretch marks indicates a loss of skin elasticity and can severely influence the outcome and longevity of breast lifting (and other body contouring) procedures.

In person consultation with well experienced board-certified plastic surgeons will be the best place to start.  As you do your “homework” you will learn about the potential risks/complications.  Also consider issues such as timing of the surgery in relation to your life circumstances ( such as relationships and/or pregnancies). Ideally, it is best to to these procedures when you have completed pregnancies and are in a long-term stable psychosocial situation.

Make sure you do your due diligence and see lots of examples of the plastic surgeons'  work.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 680 reviews

Sagging relapse of breast lift (mastopexy) in patient with stretch marks (striae)

+1

The stretch marks may indicate that your skin has poor elasticity and is at a higher risk of recurrent sagging (ptosis). This is certainly true of patients with a history of massive weight loss.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

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Palomar Starlux 1540 laser works best on stretchmarks!

+1

The shape and size of your breasts will not be affected my the existing stretchmarks but the stretchmarks on the top half of your breast will not be removed with surgery alone.  The Palomar system is the first laser system that has been FDA approved for stretchmark eradication.  You may want to have the surgery and them be treated with the laser for the best outcome.

Marisa Lawrence, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Stretch marks change the outcome of a breast lift

+1

In my opinions I differ from the previous expert posters. I do not feel the stretch marks alter the results of breast lifting surgery. Best to see 3 boarded surgeons in your area.

From MIAMI DR. B

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Breast lift should be effective, even if you have stretch marks

+1

 A breast lift (mastopexy) should provide you with improvement even if you have stretch marks. Some of your stretch marks will be removed, but some will likely remain. If your areolae have enlarged, these can be made smaller with a breast lift. With any lift, there will be some settling of the breasts as the tissues relax and the swelling goes down. So, some of the sagging comes back, though there will always be an improvement compared to where you started.

It is difficult to achieve fullness in the upper breast areas with a lift alone. If upper pole fullness is one of your goals, then you might wish to consider a breast implant, along with mastopexy. If you plan to start your family any time soon, then it would be best to wait until after your family is complete before having breast lift, with or without implants, as pregnancy will tend to undo the results of your surgery.

Michael D. Yates, MD
Huntsville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Stretch Marks MAY shorten the duration of a Breast Reduction

+1
A well-done Breast Lift will result in perky, attractive breasts. But with time, weight fluctuations and pregnancy will result in breast sagging. Since stretch marks are actually scar-filled cracks in the skin, the skin loses its normal resiliency and is apt to sag easier.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Sagging skin and breast lift

+1

Stretch marks suggest the skin quality is not good.  Performing a breast lift is fine, as with normal aging, the breasts will sag over time again.  As for the timing it is up to you.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Stretch marks and breast lift

+1

You will still have marks after the lift.  You may want to wait until after you are finished with child rearing for best long term results.

Scott E. Kasden, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Many women have stretch marks

+1

Stretch marks are very common on the breast either due to weight gain/loss and/or pregnancy.  This is very common.

You should be able to get perfect results with a breast lift even if you have stretch marks.  Certainly some of the stretch marks may not be all removed however and you should consult with a surgeon to discuss what can be achieved. 

After the lift stretch marks may make you more vulnerable to having the tissue become droopy again if you do not wear supportive bras.  Common sense says that you will need to protect the results of your lift.  Some ladies want to never wear a bra and I tell them that if you became droopy one time, you are at risk of this happening again if you do not protect your results....

Good luck!

Evan Sorokin, MD
Cherry Hill Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.