Still Have Scabs 6 Weeks Post-op? (photo)

I had a breast lift with augmentation 6 weeks ago. It worries me that I still have two big scabs under my nipples where the incision meets the vertical incision. Is it normal that they still aren't falling off? Can I do something to help them fall off?

Doctor Answers (9)

Scabs after breast lift at 6 weeks

+3

Some crusting or scabbing is not unreasonable at 6 weeks. It is jsut taking a bit more time for those areas to heal.  I was always told that small scabs are "nature's glue"  leave them alone and let them peel off  naturally. Follow closely with your sugeon.


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Scabs 6 weeks after breast augmentation.

+2

This is perfectly normal in the healing process.  Removing the scabs prematurely will give you unwanted scarring.  Your tissues are healing under this scab. 

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Concerns after Breast Augmentation/Lifting Surgery?

+2

Congratulations on having undergone the breast augmentation/mastopexy procedure; from the partial view photograph,  it appears that you are on your way to a very nice result.

 I ask that my patients leave “scabs” alone;  they are serving as a “biological  Band-Aid” while the underlying tissues are healing.

 I would also suggest that you continue to exercise patience and continued to follow up with your plastic surgeon.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 779 reviews

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Leave scabs alone

+1
Scabbing can still be present after 6 weeks. It's best to leave them alone. Picking them off will only make the resulting scar worse, and reopen your incisions.

Jerome Edelstein, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Scabbing at Six Weeks Following Breast Lift and Augmentation

+1

    The scabbing at that area is very common after a breast lift, and the result you have from a limited perspective looks good and healthy.  The plastic surgeon can always give you the best assessment.

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 230 reviews

Scabs 6 Weeks Post-op

+1

These are not uncommon, and typically are the result of a suture underneath, which by this time can be removed by your surgeon--they will otherwise take weeks to dissolve. 

Nothing is worrisome here. 

Best wishes. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Scabs still present at 6 weeks

+1

Not unreasonalble to still have scabs six weeks post-op.  You might have some suture material beneath these areas that is preventing the skin from completely healing over them.  If the suture material is absorbable, your body should heal as the suture material breaks down.  Your PS can look at determine if there is suture material that needs to be removed to allow for complete healing.

Al Cohn, MD
Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Don't pick the scabs.

+1

Hello, and thank you for your question.  I understand your frustrations but you are healing well.  Sometimes scabs stay long term because there is still tissue healing below the scabs.  This my be because the tissue in this area had a little less blood flow than the surrounding areas.  I do not see any infection in the pictures.  When the tissue is finished healing, the scab will fall off naturally.  Follow up with your PS if you still have concerns.  I would recommend avoiding picking the scabs or trying to get them off prematurely.

Best Wishes!

Pablo Prichard

Pablo Prichard, MD
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Still Have Scabs 6 Weeks Post-op?

+1

You have very slow healing in these areas. Seek more in person office visits for directed wound care. I might use RED light laser therapy to increase wound re epithilalization. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.