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Snorkeling After Rhinoplasty

I am planning on going snorkeling in 3 wks by then i should be 4 months post op. Is it safe for me to snorkel without causing any damage or irritation to my nose? Will this ruin the healing process or ruin my nose job? Not sure if it makes any difference but i will be snorkeling at key largo fl. Thanks for your help.

Doctor Answers (4)

Snorkeling after rhinoplasty

+1

Snorkeling poses a different challenge than other water sports since the water-tight mask can place significant pressure on the .  Find a mask that fits well and does not seem to compress the nose too much.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 137 reviews

Snorkling after rhinoplasty

+1

Your internal nasal tissue should be well healed and tolerate salt water. Also you nasal bone should be healed to a point where they can tolerate the mask pressure. Have fun.

David A. Bray, Sr., MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Snorkeling 4 Months After Rhinoplasty

+1

Dear RhinoNewbie-

It should be safe to go underwater and snorkel 4 months after your rhinoplasty.  You should be able to tolerate the water in your nose along with the difference in pressure underwater.  Of course, consider checking with your plastic surgeon who did your original surgery.

 

Have fun in Florida!

 

Best Wishes,

Roy Kim, MD

Roy Kim, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

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Swimming and snokeling after rhinoplasty

+1

By four months, your nose should be well healed and swimming and snorkeling should not pose any problems. Your skin may be sun sensitive up to a year after, so a swim-proof sunscreen will be helpful.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

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