Smoking Before Breast Augmentation Surgery

I am scheduled for breast implant surgery on July 14th, I quit smoking on June 29th and it is so hard so I did smoke 1 cigarette on july 4th and none since will everything be ok?

Doctor Answers (3)

Ask Your Surgeon About Smoking Before Breast Augmentation

+1
Cigarette smoke contains carbon monoxide that reduces the ability of the red blood cells in a smoker's body from transporting oxygen throughout the body. The presence of carbon monoxide in the blood is reduced by half when no cigarettes are smoked for four hours and, better yet, is reduced to a safe level if cigarettes are avoided for eight hours. Stopping smoking before and after surgery helps oxygen to more effectively travel throughout the body, an essential tool in warding off infection and successful wound healing. You should ask your surgeon if smoking that cigarette was okay. Only they would be able to adequately let you know.


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Smoking and breast augmentation.

+1

As you can imagine, smoking is bad for breast augmentation, (and surgery in general). When one takes a drag on a cigarette, the chemicals cause vasoconstriction. Wound healing is all about getting blood flow and oxygen to the tissue. I believe that you will find that each doctor may have a different opinion as to how long you need to be off cigarettes. Some will test for nicotine in the system. Best to talk with a board certified plastic surgeon. Also best to quit smoking, (for a variety of other health reasons as well).

Jeffrey Roth, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Smoking and Breast Augmentation

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   I typically recommend the cessation of smoking for one month prior to any elective procedure and for at least 6 weeks following the procedure.  Kenneth Hughes breast augmentation Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

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