Small Revision for Implants And Droopy Tuberous Breast

I had silicone implants and some "scoring" my dr called it to fix tuberous breasts. My right nipple goes down and is not even with my left. I am happier then what i had before but to me they still look tubular. But I'm really just worried about the drooping. My dr scheduled a in office visit to cut around each nipple and lift it. This apt would be 24 weeks after my surgery. Is this to soon? Will this procedure help this issue or can they go back to being droopy after the surgery? Thank you

Doctor Answers (8)

Small Revision for Implants And Droopy Tuberous Breast

+2

Thanks for the posted photos they really help. Worth the try to lift only the left N/A complex in a local anesthesia event. 


Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Asymmetric tuberous breast deformity can really be corrected.

+2

Hi.

1)  Going by your pictures, I am afraid it looks like you need a major revision under general anesthesia.

2)  I say this because: a) the base of your breasts is still very constricted, b) you have asymmetric fullness in the upper part of your breasts, c) one areola is lower and larger than the other, d) the distance between the areola and the fold under the breast is quite a bit shorter in one breast  than in the other.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

I would wait at least six months before revision

+2

You had severe tubular breast and your implants are too big for your breast tissue. You need to give it time to stretch the lower pole of the breast . The cirumareolar lift will not make it any better because the issue is the lack of tissue in the lower pole that did not let the implant to come down.

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

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Donut mastopexy to improve position of areolas

+1

Sounds like your surgeon is on top of it. I believe you will be extremely pleased with a donut mastopexy. However, 'drooping' will eventually be an issue down the line. Unfortunately, gravity always stretches tissue when it comes to implants regardless of where they  are placed. Best wishes, Dr. H

Gary M. Horndeski, MD
Texas Plastic Surgeon
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Revision after implants and a tuberous breast

+1

Your doctor is right in that a revision of the lift will improve the symmetry and shape, however the difficulty with a breast that is tuberous or has a tight fold is that it takes time for the skin envelop to relax and the shape to improve. My advice is to wait at least six to nine months, perhaps a year and let things work together. The revision will be very nice, but don't rush the effort. Time will work with you not against.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Sounds Appropriate

+1

It sounds like your doctor is taking the right approach. It is often difficult to do a lift in conjunction with an augmentation in a tuberous breast due to blood supply to the nipple. The delayed donut lift should make things much better. Your symmetry should be much improved. Good Luck.

Brian Klink, MD
Vacaville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Tuberous breasts

+1

I'm not sure how long it has been since your initial surgery but, from the look of your photos, your breasts still seem to have some of the characteristics of a tuberous deformity.  The surgery that is suggested, which sounds like a circumareolar breast lift, should correct the issue if done effectively.

Scott E. Newman, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Breast Revision

+1

Tubular breasts are very difficult to work with.  The base is small and they tend to droop more. Thank you for your question and good luck with everything.

Vivek Bansal, MD
Danville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

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