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Small Lipoma on Face Removal?

Hi.. I've been diagnosed with a small lipoma on my face (less than 1.cm); i first noticed it abt 2 years ago and i was bit smaller .. It has a brighter color than my skin. I was offered three treatment options 1.to shave it off 2.to use an electrical current to 3.to use laser All three options were discussed to resurface the skin structure .. I was told that the brighter skin color could not be treated..also i was told that i should do it right away before it gets bigger; wut do u think?

Doctor Answers (5)

Lipoma

+1

A lipoma is a fatty mass underneath the skin. There is no benefit or use for any laser or laser like contraption for treatment

New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Treatment options for lipoma

+1

A lipoma is a fatty mass that is under the skin.  The three treatment options that you mentioned sound like treatments for a skin disorder, not a lipoma.  Lipomas generally need to be removed by making a small incision in the skin and cutting the lipoma out.  This can be done under local anesthesia in an office setting in many cases.  If this is indeed a lipoma then there is no emergency for removing it, however, the do have the potential to increase in size over time.

Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Treatment of lipoma on the face

+1

Hi, can you please post some photographs so that we can provide you with sensible advice?

Lipomas are not treated by shaving/laser/electric current; neither do they cause any colour change of the overlying skin. You may have a different condition rather than a lipoma. (or your surgeon has some very unusual treatment preferences!).

There are many easy and effective ways of treating a small lump/lesion on the face, lipoma or not, seeing a photograph will help.

Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Small Lipomas Can Be Effectively Removed With Small Incision And Drainage Or Mesotherapy

+1

Piesotherapy is an excellent approach for treating most kinds of lipomas. In this procedure, following local anesthesia, a small punch (a cookie-cutter like instrument) is used to punch out a tiny hole in the center of the lipoma through which the fatty contents may be coaxed out. In most cases, the entire lipoma can be removed in this fashion, even if it is much larger than the tiny opening created by the punch--very much the way a good-sized infant may be delivered through the vagina. The wound \opening can then be stitched with only a very few, extremely fine stitches, which typically results in a tiny, often barely perceptible scar.

Alternatively, a trial of mesotherapy might be considered. A series of tiny injections of minute amounts of fat dissolving agents, such as desoxycholate (with our without concomitant injectable steroids and salmeterol)--spaced at approximately eight week intervals--may be tried and if successful in shrinking the lesion no surgery need be performed. I have practices both on the Upper East Side of NY and in Israel, and have had success with the latter approach in Israel where this form of lipolytic (fat dissolving) mesotherapy is approved and readily available.

Web reference: http://YoungerLookingWithoutSurgery.com

New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Small Lipoma on Face Removal?

+1

I am confused by your question. Lipomas are not effectively treated by shaving, electrical current or lasers. The only permanent solution for removal of a lipoma is to make a small incision in the skin and remove the lipoma in its entirety. This can be performed in the office under local anesthesia. If you do, in fact, have a lipoma and were advised to undergo one of the first three options you mentioned you should seek a second opinion with a board-certified Facial Plastic Surgeon or Dermatologist. I hope this information is helpful.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS

Web reference: http://weberfacialplasticsurgery.com/scar-treatments/

Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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