Stomach Crunches for Abdomen Skin Tightening After Significant Weight Loss?

I'm a 27-year-old male that is approximately 5'3-5'4 in height. Over the past 3 years I dropped 90 or so pounds (227 lbs to 137 lbs). All the weight was lost through diet and exercise (walking). However, I have at least 2-3 inches of excess skin that hangs in the abdominal area. Can stomach crunches or exercises resolve this problem, or is surgery the only possible solution? While I have no plans for surgery at this juncture, I might consider in the future but would prefer an alternative.

Note: I am aware that loose skin is normal with significant weight loss.

Doctor Answers (2)

Stomach exercises following massive weight loss and prior to tummy tuck

+1

Unfortunately tightening skin is probably the "holy grail" of plastic surgery. If we could tighten skin without surgery then we would not have to perform face lifts, tummy tucks, breast lifts, etc.

There are no technologies that satsifactorily and consistently tighten the skin despite the claims made.

I am a strong advocate of Pilates or Yoga style core strengthening as opposed to crunches and traditional situps that sometimes aggravates the appearance of a rectus diastasis.


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Excercise will NOT significantly tighten Abdominal Skin

+1

All the exercise in the world will not shrink loose, damaged abdominal skin. In many cases, such skin has lost its elasticity, has stretch marks and physically cannot snap back to fit the new small body frame.

Although surgery is THE way to go, you MAY want to read about Scition's SkinTyte treatment. They use multiple sessions of treating the dermis with Infrared light while keeping the top of the skin cool. The improvement may just be enough to meet your cosmetic goal. You may want to check sciton's website and photo gallery to see it.

Dr. P. Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.