Sjogren's and Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

My 57 year old friend has a mild case of Sjogren's. She also had a Mastectomy. She would like to have Breast Reconstruction. One doctor turned her down, another is willing to do the proceedure. She would like to know the pros and cons and would also like to know if the Brava proceedure would be a good choice. Thanks in advance.

Doctor Answers (3)

Breast reconstruction in patients with Sj√łgren's syndrome

+1

The concern that exists for patients with connective tissue diseases such as Sjogren's is that the disease may be associated with a vasculitis, or disorder of the small blood vessels.  This may impact on the blood supply of the skin, and interfere with wound healing.  Certainly breast reconstruction is possible by one of several techniques.  By virtue of having had the mastectomy, many of the risks of breast reconstruction are now reduced, particularly those relating to the blood supply of the skin.  The BRAVA would not be an ideal choice in this situation.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Autoimmune disease is not a reason to deny breast reconstruction

+1

Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease which like all others has no relation to silicone breast implants or to breast cancer, so I can't think of a reason why the reconstruction would be denied on that basis. Breast reconstruction could be done with an implant and an Alloderm internal bra, or with tissue flaps. BRAVA would be considered only if the reconstruction is to be done entirely with fat grafts and would be considered experimental.

Richard Baxter, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy, San Diego

+1

Sjogren's is NOT a contraindication to breast reconstruction after mastectomy.  Brava is designed for breast augmentation, NOT reconstruction.  Standard reconstruction techniques are either with breast expander and/or implant OR with autogenous tissue (transferring fat and skin from another area of the body to the breast to replace what was removed by the mastectomy).

Steve Laverson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

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