Implant Doesnt Drop After Three Month Revision?

Due to capsular contracture, I had a revision done almost three months ago on my left breast. Smooth implant, 275cc, armpit incision. The implant still has not dropped although I have been pressing the implant down during breast massage. I have been massaging the breast alot and implant is still high. Why is my implant not dropping and what else can I do to make the implant drop? My doctor is unreachable and any advise is greatly appreciated.

Doctor Answers (5)

Implant Doesn't Drop After Three Month Revision?

+1

It appears that the implant on the left side is still to high. Possibilities include capsular contracture (although you don't mention that the implant feels firm) and incomplete pocket dissection.

At this stage there is probably nothing you can do to improve this on your own. To get these even you will need another operation. I would favor using an incision in the fold, since it appears that two tries at an indirect approach to the problem have failed. Make an appointment to see your surgeon and get a plan.

All the best. 

 


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

High placement of the implant most likely with axillary approach.

+1

The implant in the picture on the left side is too high.  Axillary approaches are more likely to eventuate in this.  I believe that a surgical revision will be necessary.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Breast Implant Riding High?

+1

Thank you for the question and pictures.

It is not possible to give you precise advice without direct examination, but recurrent breast implant encapsulation or a breast implant pocket that has not been  dissected lower mouth may explain your situation.

 You will be best off seeking consultation in person with a well experienced board-certified plastic surgeon in your area. Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 682 reviews

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Implant asymmetry

+1

It is always nice to see preop photos to look at asymmetry. Why your implant has not come down?  I can not say without an exam. If the pocket is not open enough that is one reason.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

High implant after implant revision- what to do?

+1

Hi yLily,

So frustrating, I know.  Give some thought to the following issues:

1.  what was the time frame between the first and second procedure?

2. what was the position of the implant after the first procedure and what is it now?  Submuscular, subglandular?

3.  was the same incision used at original surgery and was original implant also sitting high after that surgery?

4.  has it come down at all since surgery?

Can you let me know some of these things.

This is how I approach breast implant surgery:

1.  I like to use incisions that allow me full access to the "pocket" so that I can create an adequate space, particularly at the level of the breast crease which often needs to be eased up in order for the implant to "fall" into position.  For that reason, I'm not a fan of the axillary incision and have observed that it seems to require more revisional surgery than some other incisions.

2.  a capsulectomy or capsulotomy are usually necessary at a revision for the purpose of creating adequate space around the new implant, regardless of sub glandular or sbmuscular position

3.  I have my ladies begin massage at the crease on the day after surgery and perform it 3x a day.

4.  I expect to see progression of the implant position daily and usually at 2 weeks we are close to where we want to be and the breast is soft, the implant glides within the space

Tips for what to do NOW:

1.  continue aggressive massage, particularly at the crease

2.  make an appt to see your doctor, don't wait for a call back

3.  seek answers to the questions above

4.  be open minded about the possibility of another revision and if so, give consideration to a incision at the crease of the breast.

Thank you.  Dr. Ellen

 

 

 

was a capsulectomy or capsulate performed at the time of the surgery

Ellen A. Mahony, MD
Westport Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.