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Is Silikon 1000 Safe to Use?

What are the risks?

Doctor Answers (4)

Silicone is a dangerous filler

+2

Silicone, if free in the body, is a very reactive substance. This inflammatory reaction takes many years to develop in many patients, but is progressive (doesn't get better) and severe It is often severely disfiguring. The silicone literally causes an inflammatory reaction in adjacent tissues. If you look at the cells under a microscope, they are grossly inflamed by a granulomatous reaction, with foreign bodies casting a birefringent light, literally plastic in the skin surrounded by the body's defenses.

The reason we know this is that we have had to treat many patients who were injected with liquid silicone. Their stories are eerily similar. At first, the effect is nice, but slowly the face starts to distort until it becomes deformed.

Surgery then becomes necessary to remove silicone laden tissue. Unfortunately, silicone cannot be located and removed. It is literally like an oil that has infiltrated the tissues, causing permanent irreparable harm.

I am saddened to see how liquid silicone in any form has had a resurgence. Why we have to reinvent the square wheel is beyond me.

As many of the readers know from the blogs, I am quite against semipermanent fillers, especially silicone, but also Artecoll, Radiesse, etc. We are already treating a wave of patients treated by Artecoll with hugely swollen lumps in their faces and hands. They have failed steroid injections and now need surgical excision, which, in advanced stages of swelling, is only a partially successful treatment.

These are my opinions derived from actual examination and treatment of patients.


Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 99 reviews

Semipermanent Fillers Are Safer Than Silicone And Other Permanent Fillers

+1
While I understand the argument that permanent fillers offer the advantage of being permanent, and certainly on the surface of things this argument is enticing, there are several good reasons NOT to use injectable permanent fillers for any facial or neck rejuvenation procedures. 

Here's an axiom: permanent fillers means permanent problems should anything go wrong during the injection process or if the aesthetic result does not  prove pleasing. It is certainly not easy and sometimes impossible to remove the permanent liquid injectable materials, like silicone, Artefill and BioAlcamid. And should they cause nodules and granulomas (deep bumps in the skin that can protrude), a type of problem that may occur even ten to twenty years after treatment, they sometimes cannot even be fully removed surgically (a process that in itself can result in scars). 

And here's a second axiom: what may look nice today may look downright odd five or ten years down the road when age-related changes take place in the skin, muscle, bone and cartilage surrounding the treated area. In other words, even a great cosmetic result right now may begin to stick out or seem misplaced when other changes occur around it with time.

Temporary and semipermanent fillers and volumizers, such as Radiesse, Voluma, Restylane SQ, Stylage XXL are natural products that are broken down with time by the body's natural enzymes, so that none of the above-related problems that may occur with permanent fillers are relevant issues with these agents--making them the safer and wiser choices for injectable, nonsurgical facial and neck rejuvenation. 

Nelson Lee Novick, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Silikon 1000 safety

+1

I recognize that the temptation to receive a permanent filler such as Silikon 1000 can be quite high. Admittedly, I have seen some very nice, natural-appearing results with this product when injected by an experienced physician with good technique. My general stance, however, in regard to permanent fillers including Silikon 1000 and Artefill (currently not available), is that it should not be done. Long-term effects are unknown, and the procedure is irreversible. The potential is there to develop granulomas (nodules that represent immune-related tissue reactions) years, even decades later. We are talking about an elective, cosmetic procedure. It is better to be safe than sorry.

Good luck.

Bryan K. Chen, MD
San Diego Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

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Really depends where you are using it

+1

While silicone is prermanent the disadvantage is that it is very permanent.  In other words if you do not like it then there is really no cure.  On the other hand the hyaluronic acid fillers like Perlane and Juvederm can be reversed.  It is for this reason that they remain my fillers of choice.

S. Randolph Waldman, MD
Lexington Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.