Sloshing Sound in Right Breast Implant

I have silicone breast implants which are one year old. Twice, I have visited sea level and returned to my home which is at a high altitude. Both times I have experienced a lot of liquid and sloshing in my right breast. Could it be related to those visits? What would cause this?

Doctor Answers (2)

Not likely air

+1

You are one year out from your surgery therefore any small amount of air that would have been in the pocket has been re-absorbed. Silicone implants themselves can't cause a sloshing sound by their semi-solid composition. One possibility would be if you had fluid that has accumultaed around the implant referred to as a seroma but I can't imagine how this could be altitude-dependant. It is always a good idea to check with your plastic surgeon for your reassurance.

Dr Edwards


Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Sloshing in implant: Many different causes but discuss with your surgeon

+1

This sounds very unusual and not something that I have heard of before.

However, you should discuss with your plastic surgeon and you may want to consider a breast ultrasound the next time this happens. Although rupture would be rare this early after the procedure, it is a possibility and may explain an inflammatory condition aggravated by the atmospheric pressure changes. One other possiblity is that small amounts of air in breast implants are known to expand up to 3 times when flight attendants complaints of breast implant swelling with airplane travel were studied. Perhaps you are developing small air bubble that are causing an audible "sloshing". This is pure speculation and is generally of no consequence other than the annoying sound.

I hope this helps

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

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