Had my Silicone Implants 28 Yrs. No Issues - Should I Have Them Removed?

Doctor Answers (8)

Silicone Breast Implants after 28 Years?

+1

If you are doing well and there have been no problems with the breast implants ( and an MRI study shows no evidence of leakage) there is no reason to have them removed.

Best wishes.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 750 reviews

Removing breast implants

+1

As long as you're not having any problems, you should be fine.  However, make sure you're doing monthly self breast exams and yearly mammograms.

Jeffrey E. Schreiber, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 71 reviews

Implant for 28 years: so what's next?

+1

The decision to remove and/or replace depends on several factors such as: your age, the type of implant, overall medical health, financial status, etc. There is no one right decsion. However, I would likely request an MRI to assess implant integrity or lack of such.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

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Should I remove silicone breast implants if they are not bothering me?

+1

My advice is "if it ain't broke, don'e fix it"

If your breasts look and feel fine, there is no reason to remove or replace the implants.

Michael A. Jazayeri, MD
Santa Ana Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

28 year old silicone breast implants

+1

The way to understand the issues regarding silicone gel-filled breast implants is that there is no known medical reason or threat to your health because they are there or because they are X number of years old. The reason to remove or replace them would be because you choose to do this. It's still a cosmetic choice on your part as it was to have them put in. 

The other issue is whether your current implants are intact. Again, there is no known threat to your health if they aren't intact but it makes sense to remove or replace them if they are known to be ruptured (failed). The problem is knowing whether they are intact. There is currently no simple way to prove that gel-filled breast implants are intact. Physical exam, mammograms, and ultrasound are not reliable and MRI, the best current test, is quite expensive. Silicone gel-filled implants that are 28 years old are on the border between implants of the era that had a high rate of failure and the generation of gel-filled implants that held up much more reliably. (Current gel-filled breast implants are even more reliable). 

I would not advise removing or replacing them just because of their age but because you personally are worried about the issue of whether they are intact or because you want to make changes in the size, type, or position of the implants. This is also assuming that there are no visible or felt abnormalities or findings in the breast tissue requiring diagnosis or treatment. 

Scott L. Replogle, MD
Denver Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

28 year old Silicone Implants

+1

If you are not having any issues at the point concerning your implants then I would recommend you do not have them removed.  If you are still concerned the have a complete exam by a board certified plastic surgeon.

Dr. ES

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Breast implant removal

+1

If there is no medical problem then the decsion is yours.

If the mammogram is normal, implants intact, and there is no medcal problem, and you are happy  you can leave the implants. On the other hand if the implats have failed, capsular contracture, displaced implants or you do not want the implants any more then you canremove them

You can remove the implants and have them replaced with either  silicone or saline implants

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

Silicone implants

+1

Having an exchange of yoru implants or just removed really depends upon how they look and feel and what you want.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.