Should I Pay for Blepharoplasty Surgery Upfront?

My physician is asking me to pay the full sum of a blepharoplasty 'up front', two weeks before the surgery.  Is that legit?

Doctor Answers (16)

Blepharoplasty payment

+2

Good question. Payment in advance is the norm and avoids dealing with "business matters" the day of surgery when our team's focus is entirely on you and your surgery.


Boston Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

It is standard practice to prepay for cosmetic surgery

+2

You have no choice. If you want to have cosmetic surgery -- you will have to pre-pay for it. It is a standard practice to pay for cosmetic surgery BEFORE the surgery.

Surgery is very similar to flying a plane with the exception that a Plastic surgeon does NOT book more procedures into the same time slot as airlines do. You cannot fly unless you buy a ticket and if you cancel -- you will be subject to cancellation fees.

As surgeons, we reserve a block of time just for you. That block of time is valuable and cannot be filled at a short notice once you cancel or do not show up. Once you cancel, for whatever reason, we sustain a financial loss.

If you want to know what are your options, I suggest you read your surgeon's cancellation policy. Every doctor is different and such policies vary.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Payment of Cosmetic Surgery

+2

Thanks for the question -

Typically payment for cosmetic procedures is required prior to surgery. Most practices have cancellation policies to deal with the need to reschedule, postpone or cancel surgery.

Be sure to ask prior to deciding on surgery.

I hope this helps.

Steven H. Williams, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

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Blepharoplasty Payment

+1

Payment in advance for cosmetic procedures is the norm. Two weeks is appropriate to allow time for the payment to process properly.

Kris M. Reddy, MD, FACS
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Prepayment for surgery

+1
Cosmetic surgery requires a deposit and full payment prior to the scheduled surgery date, subject to cancellation and refund policies. Your surgeon should provide all such policies to you at the time of scheduling so there will be no misunderstanding. The surgeon is not only committing his time to you but also retaining the services of other medical professionals, including the anesthesiologist. I do not apply a cancellation fee if the reason is legitimate and the surgery is rescheduled but otherwise retain a portion of the deposit, on a sliding scale, to cover the lost time and compensate the anesthesiologist appropriately.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Payment for cosmetic surgery

+1

Thank you for your question. It is standard practice to request payment a couple of weeks in advance for cosmetic procedures including blepharoplasty. As others have pointed out, it is always a good idea to understand your surgeon's cancellation and other policies prior to finalizing payment. Good luck.

James M. Pearson, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Payment is up front for cosmetic procedures

+1

  IMHO, this is the standard paractice of most good physicians who do this kind of work.

Lawrence Kass, MD
Saint Petersburg Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Paying before surgery

+1

This is absolutely legit. The surgeon is reserving a spot in your name with the facility and anesthesiology service, not to mention his or her time where they can be doing surgery on someone else. Unfortunately some patients in the past do things such as not paying their bill or cancelled the day of surgery for minor reasons and left the surgeon out on the limb. Thus the payment is done to reserve the spot. There is variation between surgeons as to how much and how early but almost everyone does so.

Chris Thiagarajah, MD
Washington DC Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Payment Up Front For Blepharoplasty

+1

It is quite the norm for plastic surgery patients to pay the full amount in advance of the procedure date. As the other surgeons here have pointed out this is common practice for nearly every office. We have a policy of having patients place a 20% deposit at the time of booking. This essentially reserves that time slot for their scheduled case. Two weeks prior to the surgery we then request the remaining balance to be paid in full.

By that point the surgery schedule has been established for the coming weeks. The anesthesiologist has reserved that date and time for the case and the facility has booked sufficient staff to be present. This requires a high level of commitment by many involved parties just for that case. If payment was not required in advance and a patient decides to cancel the surgery last minute (barring a legitimate emergency), all of the involved parties (surgeon, anesthesiologist and facility staff) would have insufficient time to salvage the day by booking another surgical case.

John M. Hilinski, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Paying in advance for surgery

+1

Paying for surgery in advance is the rule of thumb. It may seem questionable asking for payment two weeks in advance, but it really makes sense when you think about the preparations involved. The operating room needs to be reserved and so does anesthesia.

That sets three or four people's schedules in motion and also requires their payment in advance. The surgeon is reserving his/her time for your procedure, which takes it away from other patients who might want the same date. Your surgeon might miss out on caring for another patient who wants the same date because of your reservation of that date. That is why procedures are paid for in advance of surgery.

Also be aware that most offices will take a non-refundable deposit to hold a date (this can be part of your payment in full if you never left a deposit). Be sure to know the policy when paying. The deposit helps off-set the costs of a last minute cancellation. In most cases, you can apply everything you have paid to another date in the event that you need to cancel and reschedule. If you need to completely cancel the procedure, more than likely you will forfeit some portion of your payment.

I hope this info helps!

Adam Rubinstein, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.