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Seroma After Breast Lift? my swelling has been going down how long will it take for it to be completely gone. (photo)

I had a tummy tuck and breast lift no implant 12 days ago my PS discovered a small seroma. Also how long will I be able to work again I don't do any heavy lifting I just walk a little .. The top picture was when I found something was going on and the bottom is the picture the next day

Doctor Answers (9)

Seroma or Hematoma After Mommy Makeover Breast Lift Often Needs to be Aspirated

+3

Thank you for your question.

From your photos it looks as if the problem is resolved.

If fluid returns your surgeon may decide to do a needle aspiration to remove the fluid. This works very well.


Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Seroma after breast surgery.

+1

Hello and thanks for your post. If you're concerned about whether a small seroma persists you might want to talk to your PS about getting an ultrasound of the area in question. Best wishes, Dr. Aldo.

Aldo Guerra, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 133 reviews

Seroma vs Hematoma

+1

Hello,

Thank you for the question and the photos.  Both seroma and hematoma will likely resolve on their own without too much repercussion.  If either persist for a lengthy period of time your body may form some scar tissue.  Excessive scar tissue may result in some asymmetry.  If this happens you may require a revision to help correct that.

All the best,

Dr. Remus Repta

Remus Repta, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Seromas usually resolve in a week or so with sequential aspirations.

+1

Seromas of the breast after mastopexy are unusual. All small seromas are best treated by sequential aspirations in the office. Usually only two or three aspirations are necessary.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Outcome after breastlift ok?

+1

I think you look very good for such a short time out from surgery. Activities are generally limited for about 4 weeks, but you need to check with your surgeon what he/she follows and recommends. Best of luck!

Michele A. Shermak, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Seroma after Breast Lifting and Returning to Activities?

+1

I am glad that the complication you have experienced  is resolving and you appear to be doing well.

Returning to specific activities is best advised by your own plastic surgeon. Remember that he/she knows exactly what was done, how you are doing, whether you are experiencing any additional complications, exactly what type of activities you plan to return to, and is ultimately responsible for care.
 

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 759 reviews

Seroma After Breast Lift?

+1

Healing time is based upon an average time frame. You will be over that because of the seroma. Best to follow your chosen PSs advise. I would wait a full month before working again if you were my patient. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

Activities after breast lift with seroma complication

+1

Your post operative care should be directed by your plastic surgeon.  In general I would have a breast lift patient avoid activities that cause the breast to bounce up and down for the first 6 weeks.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Post Operative Swelling

+1

As a general rule, I usually tell my patients that the overall swelling to a surgical site will resolve in approximately 3 weeks initially to 3 months. I believe that you should be able to return to work in about another week. However, I would defer the final answer to your PS as he/she knows your care. Best of luck to you.  

Arturo H. Armenta, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.